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    Visual basic 6 still worth learning?


    Other than some by hand web design years ago I have No programming experience
    I recently bought a book from a second hand book store for $1.00 Titled "Learn to Program with visual basic 6" by John smiley. I was bored yesterday and decided to read a couple chapters. I like the way it reads and believe I could easily get into programming with this book. However this book is over 10 years old and visual basic 6 wont be supported after windows 7.

    My question is, I have visual basic 6, and installed a virtual xp machine to run it on, but I guess I just don't know if its worth it?
    Would it make sense to learn visual basic 6 then later I could transfer that knowledge to Visual studio 2010? (the main reason is that I already have a book for it lol) OR are the languages and GUIs too different to where learning 6 wont help me with visual studio at all?

    I don't really know what my goal with learning programming is in terms of what id like to do, just the idea of being able to create my own programs in general sounds good, maybe someday id get into old console emulation or something I don't know.

    If you're suggestion is not to learn vb6 or vs2010 and start somewhere else entirely, please tell me what language, and where to get the best book with which to learn it. Thanks!
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    Visual Studio is Microsoft's ("integrated") developement enviroment for various languages, including (but for god's sake not limited to) Visual Basic. VB 6 is a language which, as you noticed yourself, is kind of buried by its creators (Microsoft). The successor is called Visual Basic .NET and though it look similar, word is that it's semantically closer the other .NET languages than to VB... can't judge that. I don't know enough about VB or VB.NET to give advice about them. But neither will be suitable for console emulation... and as a grim structural programmer, I tend to mistrust everything with a basic in its name or a goto statement availiable.
    If you want to stick with visual studio (that is, .NET languages), I suggest C#. If you ever get deeper into programming, you don't get around the scary-looking parts of it anyway. And it has LINQ = functional features, which is a huge plus imho.
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    Thanks for a reply, I now get that I was wording parts of my question incorrectly, I guess I should have said will learning visual basic 6 carry over to a basic understanding of .NET language in visual studio 2010.

    But judging from what you said it doesn't really sound like the case.
    You mentioned I should start with C# which is a .net language, does a program come with VS2010 to write in this language? Sorry to sound so noobish, but what can I say, I am.

    Also a big thing that attracted me to visual basic, Is that I hear its easy to learn and like its visual basis. How does c# compare?
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    But judging from what you said it doesn't really sound like the case.
    It isn't . VB6 is basically defunct (i.e. maintenance of old apps only). Unless you are trying to work at a job where VB6 is required, don't touch it.

    You mentioned I should start with C# which is a .net language, does a program come with VS2010 to write in this language?
    VS2010 is the program. That's the point of the IDE.

    Also a big thing that attracted me to visual basic, Is that I hear its easy to learn and like its visual basis. How does c# compare?
    Here's how I see the current ecosystem of languages. If you want something easier than C#, the two big choices are Python and Ruby. I know VB is marketed as easier than C#, but I think given what C# is, and what VB is now, it's not.

    The whole argument of VB is easier comes from pre-C# days. That was when it was C++ and VB6, and Python and Ruby weren't as mature as today. It's not 2000 anymore. With 2010, the two best languages for beginners are Python and C#, I think.
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    I cut my teeth on VB3 waaaay back in the day. It was good for learning. I moved up and up to VB6 eventually, and again, it wasn't the most powerful language, but it was very easy to put together an application that was functional. I briefly moved to VB.NET, but then moved to C#, and haven't looked back.

    I agree with the above posts. VB6 is getting beyond it's used by date. I personally would start with ruby or C# these days. You can get a free compiler for all of the .NET stuff from the microsoft site. I have done pretty much nothing in Ruby, so my recommendation of it is purely based on hear-say. I would say there are a number of good free compilers on the interwebs for ruby also.

    A big plus for both of these languages is that they can be used for both Application and Website development through ASP.NET and Ruby on Rails.

    If you are looking at exclusively doing Web Dev, then you may also like to look at PHP. It has a great wealth of resources available for free on the net that can help you through almost any problem.

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    VB being "easier" comes from ye olde times when your only real other options where C/C++ or even older languages. What made it easy was not the syntax but the way it allowed to handle higher level concepts without concerning yourself too much with low level problems like memory management or pointers.

    Today VB is still "easy" to learn - don't get me wrong - but most other popular languages are about equal now.

    Personally I wouldn't bother with VB6. Sure you'll be able to take things you learn there to another language but it's a dying species. Considering there are plenty of equally simple "current" languages out there you might just as well learn one of those instead.

    I'd also like to throw Java in the mix and I still prefer it when it comes to Desktop applications because you can't do a sophisticated gui in .NET without at least one commercial library of GUI components.

    I don't know about Ruby or Python except that they're very popular too.

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    • sir_drinxalot agrees : except I'm a Java hater :P....but, yes it too is good.
    - Hugh of Borg

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    isn't VB still used in MS office software for macros? or is there an option to use c#.net for example?

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