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    Learning enough to start a career


    I have discovered I love programming/web development, and would like to pursue a career in the industry. I am good at self learning, but I am struggling to figure out just what I need to learn to get an entry level job.

    So far, I have the following skills:
    • C++ - can make good black box programs, but haven't done anything graphical
    • HTML - can make web pages using HTML/CSS well enough for it to look how I want
    • Ruby - have a basic understanding at about the level I know C++
    • Actionscript - able to make basic games in flash using all code


    My questions are:
    • What languages are best to learn for an entry level job?
    • How deep do I need to learn these languages? (be as specific as you can)
    • What are any especially good sources for learning the skills I will need? (Online, books, etc)
    • What types of things would be good to make for a portfolio (since I have no training or experience)?


    Please answer any or all of the questions if you have the time. Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks!
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    Originally Posted by Fugis
    My questions are:
    • What languages are best to learn for an entry level job?
    • How deep do I need to learn these languages? (be as specific as you can)
    • What are any especially good sources for learning the skills I will need? (Online, books, etc)
    • What types of things would be good to make for a portfolio (since I have no training or experience)?
    Well these questions are rather subjective. The best languages to learn for entry level programming jobs include as many as possible. The more experience you have with different languages, in my opinion, the better off you'll be contributing towards company goals. Learning languages depends on what you want to develop and it's best to know that set of languages as best you can. Both W3Schools and Tutorials Point are worth having a look at as well but they are better as references than programming tutorials. If your interested in tutorials, Code Academy has interactive tutorials for learning the various web languages as well as working with API's. And the best portfolio to have is a portfolio of experience. Anyone can write code, developers are separated by those who can find and fix bugs as well as avoid them. The best recommendation I can make is to pick a language and start programming.
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    Hey, thanks for the reply! I've used Codecademy and found it to be a great way to learn syntax and such for new languages. I will check out those other sources you suggested.

    I left the question several weeks ago, and have since been messing around trying to learn Ruby at a higher level.

    This morning I finally stopped reading theory and started trying to make an app to help my Dad organize some files for his job. Much to my surprise, someone finally responded to my question! I will take your advice and try to make a bunch of programs. The hardest part is figuring out what to make and getting started.

    Anyways, just thought I'd come on and say thanks for the advice!
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    Not a problem, I wanted to be constructive about it because I was in the same boat five years ago with horrible forums that didn't really offer much help, horrible people that weren't encouraging, and people just saying go google it, not very becoming of the industry if you ask me.

    Another suggestion is to start by building software you could benefit from. For example, I've written my own apps for keeping track of gas consumption, and for staying productive on mobile devices.

    For some strange reason the forums don't allow people to show URL's or their own work, which is really stupid when trying to encourage people to enter the industry. But google gasomatic (or just add a .mobi to the url) and you'll see an example of a webapp running on JavaScript/JQuery Mobile. If your interested in web apps or mobile apps, learning HTML/JavaScript/CSS/Jquery is definitely a good option, and Code Academy is a good start as your already aware of.
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    Cool app! That's one thing I need to start doing is putting stuff online. I don't have a domain yet, but I think I'll get one for practicing and try to make some stuff similar to what you did there.

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