Thread: Bsd?

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  1. Mobbing Gangster
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    from there, you set your configurations, choose your media, the sit back and watch it download and install.
    aight, so I download those files, use rawrite to put them on disk, then boot my rig from that disk. Easy. But then what? Do I really just kick back and wait for it to download components?
    And also I am making dual boot (yeah Ive read post about that being a bad idea), xp && freebsd, is there something I have to do before installing bsd? Or will it take over?
    And you know I mean that.
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    The settings you will encounter are things like the distribution (developer, user, xuser, minimum, etc), the disk partitions, disk labels, etc. Its pretty straight forward.

    I am not sure about the dual boot, but it is apparently easy to do, and comes with a boot manager to juggle b/w the 2 systems.

    Consult the handbook about this because I am not sure.

    Brett
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    >> yeah Ive read post about that being a bad idea

    Not only is it a bad idea, it's also Rule No. 1 and on the top of the list of what you shouldn't do in BSD, these days.
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    rule #1


    and is it for any particular reasons?

    edit: whats wrong with using iso's? I mean box I want to install bsd on doesn't have net access so i can download during installation...
    Last edited by AlCapone; October 4th, 2001 at 08:05 PM.
    And you know I mean that.
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    1) When your Windows is infected by boot sector virus or the like, it will corrupt your partition table, there is no difference whether you are using NT/BSD bootloader. This makes your FreeBSD an innocent victim. That's why many FreeBSD dualbooters often ask "why my machine suddenly refuses to boot up?"

    2) Interruption and inconsistency:
    - Your mom: Hey, why can't I send mail?
    - You: sorry mom, I am not using FreeBSD at this moment
    - Your buddy: Hey, I haven't finished downloading the 600MB ISO file from your FTP server. Why you reboot to Windows?
    - You: Sorry I don't boot into FreeBSD all the time.
    - Your buddy: WTF.
    You might argue that you don't use FreeBSD as a server OS. If that's the case, why bother to try FreeBSD in the first place?

    3) Extended caution:
    Since you are new at this, you need to invest more time on learning the OS. As a beginner, you will often end up reinstalling the OS over and over again if something isn't done right. When reinstalling or upgrading, if you have done something incorrectly, both Windows and FreeBSD can fsck'ed up, even they are on a different disk, not to mention if they are on the same physical disk.

    4) Different OS, different configuration. It's a waste of time to sync your bookmark, preference, addressbook, ICQ contact lists or the like when you are booting into one or the other. Well, you might say you can store them in your Windows partition and mount them while using FreeBSD. Look at (1) above. In addition, things just don't work well when you are relying on some files that reside on msdos partition while you are working with FreeBSD. When FreeBSD crashes, it's possible to damage your msdos partition causing you unable to boot back to Windows any longer, or lost of data at the very least.

    5) Hardware is no longer unaffordable. If you can't even afford to buy a McDonald mini-meal, FreeBSD is not your toy. Unlike Windows, FreeBSD runs okay on 486 with 16mb RAM and 2GB hard disk. Why can't you build another box and avoid all the troubles?

    In the end, I have to say FreeBSD needs consistency. So STAY UPTIME! DON'T REBOOT!. Booting into Windows today then boot into FreeBSD tomorrow is just inconsistent.
    Last edited by freebsd; October 4th, 2001 at 09:02 PM.
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    >> whats wrong with using iso's?

    There is nothing wrong with ISO itself. However:

    1) FreeBSD team fills up tons of useless craps (software in binary format). Keep in mind, *BSDs have got the ports system - a way to compile/download/install software to make your life easier.
    2) You only need the base system binaries. The others are really out-of-date.
    3) Base system - around 150mb
    ISO - 650mb
    4) This is the main reason: If you can download the ISO file, you obviously have a CD burner. That said, you can download the base system and burn them to CD, then install FreeBSD from CD.

    In addition, you should never download a -RELEASE version, download the -STABLE version instead.
    Go to releng4.freebsd.org or stable.freebsd.org FTP site and download the latest snapshot and without anything in packages and XF86336 directory.
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    thanks, freebsd


    thanks for your sharp replies, some of it really helped me, some of it didn't make sense, some of it I couldn't realate to
    Anyway, so I need to go to ftp://stable.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD...011004-STABLE/ and download everything but packages/xf86336, correct? Then what? do I just stuck them on cd?
    Dont get me wrong, I am not all that stupid, its just that I haven't had a chance to work with *nix family before (no counting few weeks on slackware)

    again, big thanks, I think that will help me get goin once I get some box for bsd.
    And you know I mean that.
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    If your box has a NIC, I would definately go ftp. Reading the installation instructructions at http://www.freebsd.org will explain a lot.

    Also, remember that we learn by toying around with stuff, breaking it, and remembering not to do that dumb thing again...just so we can break it again doing something else. Its a learning process, so go for it...nobody is born a *nix god, people just start thinking they are one because they tend not to break stuff the way *nix newbies and mortals do.

    Brett
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    >> do I just stuck them on cd?

    Yup.

    >> Then what?

    Grab rawrite.exe then write kern.flp and mfsroot.flp to two floppies and kern.flp floppy is bootable.
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    I don't really know what you mean when you are saying network, and freebsd is right, it's very bad to just hook things up to a network and not knowing how to stop people from getting in... or at least make it harder.

    However, scince you are a beginner, there is simply one way to learn how to secure a box, and that is to install the operating system you want to try and then use and abuse it

    So, my suggestion is, don't hook the computer up towards internet or any other unsafe connection. Then, run a cable to your Windows machine. Now you have one server (hopefully) that is FreeBSD, and one client (your windows box). And, if you trust yourself not to hack your own box, you should be safe. Now, this is a good setup to learn. No threats, you can do whatever you want. Now, after you have learned enough to safely open up a server with all that entails, then you just hook it up to your internet connection, and start serving whatever it is you want to serve.

    Allso, you shouldn't be afraid to fail, failing is what makes people good. The better a person is, the more time he/she has failed once or twice (hopefully never three times though) Everyone does in the beginning... even the ones that are gurus now.
    It's part of the learning process...

    So, if you want to install KDE and learn from there, do that. If you want to learn command line, do that. After all, if you use the system, you'll be faced with all sorts of problems, and later or questions by others. Then it's good to know both commandline and GUI. Heck, you can even install it during installation, eventhough freebsd argued against it. I mean, eventually you'll want to install things on the box, and then you'll learn.

    I'm not saying freebsd is wrong, I'm saying it doesn't matter that much in which order you learn things. And, commandline is usually much more usefull to know then KDE/GNOME/whatever... BUT, starting with what you find most boring, is a shure way of getting tired of a system fast, and might even lead to you not wanting to continue to learn, and all is a waste.

    /Fjodor
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