Thread: Bsd?

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    Bsd?


    Ok, i'm really deep into the programming-****, but i didn't have enough time to play with unixes yet, so don't throw your weared shorts at me if this question is a little bit silly:

    What is / means BSD?
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  3. o0o.o0o
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    BSD is a family of Unix clones that are related to the original project developed at the University of California in Berkely.

    Just like Linux is a free Unix clone, so is Free/Net/Open BSD, although its development philosophy and usages licenses are somewhat different.

    Check out:

    http://www.freebsd.com
    http://www.bsdtoday.com
    + more links via those sites

    I have been playing around with it, and I really like it.

    Brett
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    aight, continuing the topic, which one of bsds you would recommend for the beginner? I mean 'beginner' as a beginner in *nix. And also, I ve several cds for download, which ones are required and which ones are optional? Its not like it matters to me, I can dl all of them with ease, but just I'd like to know.
    And you know I mean that.
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    >> which one of bsds you would recommend for the beginner?

    Start out with FreeBSD and stick with it if you don't have good reasons to use Net or Open.

    >> I mean 'beginner' as a beginner in *nix

    Then *BSDs probably is not for you at this moment. Start by buying a UNIX for dummies book.

    >> which ones are required and which ones are optional?

    Just download the base system, no more, no less. Never download any ISO files.
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    >>Then *BSDs probably is not for you at this >>moment. Start by buying a UNIX for dummies book.

    This guy is helpful, but thinks you have to be God's gift to *nix to run *BSD.

    In my opinion, it is easier to learn your way around Unix clones on FreeBSD because of its maturity and standardizations. I find it easier that poking around Linux distros that can be pretty different in some cases.

    Regardless, it is beneficial to get a book if you have little or no experience with *nix. If you program in it, then you should have no problem with the concepts, but if all you work with is Mac or Windows, then it will take some toying around to get used to it.

    I am still learning my way around FreeBSD, but it is not that hard. Then again, I do not plan on doing much hacking of the source code just yet.

    As far as getting it set up, I would suggest using ftp as the media of choice. You will first have to create 2 disks as outlined on the FreeBSD website (freebsd.org). You do this by downloading 2 floppy images and a utility to create the floppies from these images.

    This can be done through DOS (windows,etc)

    Once you do this, all you do is boot the machine with the 'kern.flp' image burned on it. It will load, then ask for the 'msfroot.flp' disk ... from there, you set your configurations, choose your media, the sit back and watch it download and install.

    Please consult http://www.freebsd.org for actual details.

    Brett
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    >> I would suggest using ftp as the media of choice

    That would be the best suggestion.

    >> downloading 2 floppy images and a utility

    You can try rawrite.exe utility. It can be downloaded in the tools directory from the FTP site.

    >> It will load, then ask for the 'msfroot.flp' disk

    It should be mfsroot.flp
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    Uhmm again a newbie-question. I know *nix is for command-line-lovers, though i would like to install a desktop (KDE maybe?).

    Does anybody have KDE or GNOME on his FreeBSD-box running? As far as i could find out, KDE could run on FreeBSD, as the documentation states 90% Linux-compatibility.

    And another thing i am interrested in is:

    I plan to have a Server with FreeBSD, and my W2K-Machine. Is there any possibility to open a window in W2K which shows the content of the K-Desktop?

    I want the server to be completly remote-controlable over the LAN, cause it will stand in my wardrobe (you know, the noise... )!
    Last edited by Pushkin; October 4th, 2001 at 04:54 AM.
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  15. Wiking
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    The easiest thing is to use telnet or ssh to log in to your *BSD machine and control it from there. Coz if you're going to put the box in a closet somewhere, there's no need to run a graphical desktop on it, is there? That'll just waste system resources...

    I've tried some free client/server with which you can run X-windows remotely, but I just don't remember the name of it, or where it can be found. I'll see if I can find it somewhere...

    /NoXcuz
    UN*X is sexy!
    who | grep -i blonde | date; cd ~; unzip; touch; strip; finger; mount; gasp; yes; uptime; umount; sleep
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    I'm just fascinated by the idea that you have your server standing anywhere you like, and control it from anywhere you like.

    System-resources are not the deal as this is not a production-server, more a cheap C3 800 MHz / 128 MB RAM box for playing around w it.

    A complete server for 150$!
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    >> I'm just fascinated by the idea...

    ALL of your ideas are bad and insecure and they are something you shouldn't do in BSD.

    >> I know *nix is for command-line-lovers, though i would like to install a desktop (KDE maybe?)

    Bad #1:If you really wanted to learn from the basics, don't run X, not to mention KDE or Gnome.

    >> I plan to have a Server with FreeBSD, and my W2K-Machine

    Bad #2: If you are referring to dual booting FreeBSD+Win2k, that's very bad. When you are running *NIX, often as a server, everything needs to stay consistent. Dualbooting your box is inconsistent. Hardware is no longer expensive, just build another box and run FreeBSD on it.

    >> I want the server to be completly remote-controlable over the LAN
    >> and control it from anywhere you like

    Bad #3: Since you are new at this, it's highly suggested for you to learn how to secure your box in the first place. Wanting to enable remote access immediately without any understanding is real bad.

    >> A complete server for 150

    Get more RAMs. It's not that 128MB is insufficient, but RAMs is as cheap as a McDonald Mini-meal. So there's just no reason not to get more.
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    > ALL of your ideas are bad and insecure and they are
    > something you shouldn't do in BSD.

    LKJDLUIHROIEU SODFJK!!!!!!!!! You missunderstand why i want the server.



    >> Bad #1:If you really wanted to learn from the basics, don't run X, not to mention KDE or Gnome.

    I want to learn from the basics, but i want to try a visual desktop as well! Sometime i develop Java-Apps with GUIs and i need a way to test em on FreeBSD. Basically, i just want to "play" with this thingy.



    >> Bad #2: If you are referring to dual booting.

    No, i plan to have 1 workstation (W2K) and 1 server (FreeBSD).



    >> Bad #3: Since you are new at this, it's highly suggested for you to learn how to secure your box in the first place. Wanting to enable remote access immediately without any understanding is real bad.

    Uhm... but that's what i'm really interested in, to programm remote controls. I will put my Server in the wadrobe in my room, no mouse, no keyboard, no screen after successfull install.

    I use this server as a place to test my apps, as a router, as a game-server for LAN-parties and i will programm something that sux big files for me over night. When im not at home, and i want to listen to my fav-mp3s, i just login at my little server and suck the files i need... The reason i do not use my workstation is: it makes a sound like an aeroplane, and it just sux to sleep with this noise, and i want something to practice on (client-server-apps).

    It's not an production-environment.



    >> Get more RAMs. It's not that 128MB is insufficient, but RAMs is as cheap as a McDonald Mini-meal. So there's just no reason not to get more.

    There is one reason: i don't have lots of $ at the moment.
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    >> but i want to try a visual desktop as well

    Your previous posts sound like you can't live without X.

    >> When im not at home, and i want to listen to my fav-mp3s

    Then make sure you know how to secure it prior to setting it up.
    Since you are new at this, there are at least 50 other essentials steps you should do at first. Installing X during initial install is just plain bad.
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    >> Installing X during initial install is just plain bad.

    True. Of course i will first try the essentials, make my darling secure, then move on to X, KDE or whatever.

    BTW: Can anybody recommend me a good book on FreeBSD?
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    Buying a FreeBSD book is equivalent to buying 1GB of RAMs. Think twice.

    Really, you don't need to buy any book at all. There are just far more resources available on the Internet. So start by reading official FreeBSD handbook, then subscribe to the mailing list. You also can join BSD-specific forums like -> http://bsdvault.net, in case you are too shy to ask questions on the mailing list or worry to get flamed by those people.
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    in case you are too shy to ask questions on the mailing list or worry to get flamed by those people.
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