#1
  1. 63 dorinte
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    Program uses idprio, don't want to run as root


    I just successfully installed 6.1 FreeBSD on a spare machine, this is my first time tinkering with BSD since ~1994-95. So far I really like it, but am having trouble with an application. I understand that this is a permissions problem, but do not understand how to solve it without running the application logged in as root. I searched here and Google and read the relevant manpages, but I am still stuck.

    The application is boinc_client, got it using pkg_add without any trouble. The problem is that it is built to use idprio to set the process priority lower (like nice), but only root is allowed to change a processes priority. The result is that if I run boinc as a non-root user, it exits immediately with
    Code:
    idprio: Operation not permitted
    Is there a way to allow a non-root user to run the application with a su root only for idprio? Or is there another solution that I would not be aware of, not being familiar with BSD?

    Or do I just need some sleep?

    Thanks,

    Ben N1NP
  2. #2
  3. 63 dorinte
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    Nevermind.

    I could not get the boinc-client to function properly, even running as root, and even though the problem had been discussed elsewhere (boinc forum) no resolution has been posted.

    So I have given up trying to run boinc on BSD and have set up a Folding@Home client instead (and even joined the DevFolding team ). The setup was non-intuitive, but well-documented especially the
    Code:
    $brandelf -t Linux FAHxConsole
    trick (I'm guessing that is saying "interpret this file as a Linux-ELF binary"? Anyway, it has returned a work unit and n1np is on the list!

    Ben N1NP

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