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    Hardware clarification needed...


    I'm wanting to design PC that will have three dedicated hard disk drives (one for XP Pro, one for Linux Mint, and other for PC-BSD 8.1). Been told on other forums two apparently different things. One says its crucial to make certain that CPU, motherboard/chipset, graphic card, etc., supports all three operating systems. Guy on another forum says to forget hardware support, and make sure XP Pro, Linux Mint, and PC-BSD has drivers for each component to be used in the PC. I'm dazed and confused! Clarification badly needed.
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    That means exactly the same thing. A driver is software that communicates between the physical device and the operating system. In order for a CPU/chipset/graphics card/etc. to support an operating system, the operating system must have drivers for the device. Drivers are sometimes written by the people who make the operating system, often they are written by the people who make the hardware, and sometimes they are written by third parties.
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    Originally Posted by E-Oreo
    That means exactly the same thing. A driver is software that communicates between the physical device and the operating system. In order for a CPU/chipset/graphics card/etc. to support an operating system, the operating system must have drivers for the device. Drivers are sometimes written by the people who make the operating system, often they are written by the people who make the hardware, and sometimes they are written by third parties.
    Okay, so where does a newbie like me go from here? If you was wanting to design PC to guarantee that these three operating systems would run at optimal performance, what would be your process/method to choose all the proper components?
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    By a beefy machine and virtualize all three operating systems.
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    Virtualizing them is a great way to go. If you don't want to do that for some reason though, it'll probably take some work to find ideal components.

    First, pretty much everything on the market will work with Windows, so you don't need to worry about it.

    For Linux and BSD, pretty much the only way to do it is to pick out potential components and then research support for each OS (mostly involves using Google). Some hardware vendors do support Linux, far fewer support BSD.

    Standard components like CPUs, disk drives and basic chipset functionality will usually work with generic drivers. The ones you want to watch out for are the newer or more complex technology. 3D/high performance graphics drivers, wireless networking, high speed data ports (Firewire, USB 3, eSata), audio drivers, etc. can all be problematic. Basically, the newer, more specialized or more complex the hardware is, the less likely it is to work on Linux or BSD.
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    Use 3 separate computers or (as mentined) virtualization. Trying to share one machine by rebooting to different OS is an exercise in frustration imho.
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    You can also install the Windows OS as the primary system, and using a program such as virtual machines, virtual PC raise a variety of other systems, Linus, etc. ... I think it's best if I'm wrong let me correct one. For so one can try more of the system and choose the one that suits him for the work.

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