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    Unhappy Intel PENTIUM D 945 OVERHEAT


    i'm guessing its overheating
    idle:65~75(C)
    typing Word document + music :89~95(C)
    Gaming (NFS PROSTREET) :101~107(C)
    someone help!!!!
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    Is it affecting the performance of your unit?

    Is it well ventilated?
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    yes it affects the performance~
    i get this lag sometimes when im gaming, and it lags rly bad sometimes it even shuts down due to over heat

    the only thing i think might be the problem is that the oil between the cpu and the fan was all dried up and i put some new oil on which was also sorta getting dry but iunno
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    between the CPU and the fan or between the CPU and heatsink?

    you must be pertaining to the paste. Try to get a bigger fan, replace the paste then try again.
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    Thumbs up cooling


    hi had the same problem fixed it with the
    Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro Socket 775 CPU Cooler
    bought of ebay under a tenner
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    If you're using the stock heatsink/fan, I can say with almost complete certainty that therein lies your problem. Intel's stock cooling tends to perform mildly at best.

    An after-market HSF will definitely aide you here; and they're usually fairly simple to install yourself.

    If you have the room in your computer for it, I second feckineck's suggestion for the AC Freezer 7 Pro. I've got one on my Core 2 Duo and it keeps things quite chilly while not being overly loud. (Warning: It's a huge HSF, but quite well worth the effort and space.)

    Alternatively, ensure that your case has smooth airflow, too - e.g., no "pockets" where warm air would linger for a significant time. On most mid- to ATX-sized computer towers, you'll want a fan in the front near the bottom to suck in cold air and one or two near the back topside of the tower (near the CPU) to expel the used warmer air. (Mind you, this is just for CPU cooling. You'll need other stuff if you have a high end graphics or hard drives.)
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    Originally Posted by xGiro
    i'm guessing its overheating
    idle:65~75(C)
    typing Word document + music :89~95(C)
    Gaming (NFS PROSTREET) :101~107(C)
    someone help!!!!
    There is no way those numbers are right, a laptop CPU will get permanently damaged at ~105'C, if this is a desktop your system will generally be unstable at 60-70'C, temps like 90'C will make any desktop CPU literally smoke and would have long ago stopped functioning, on a desktop your BIOS should generally make the system reboot before you hit 70'C

    I suggest you check different programs, check the BIOS, if you idle at 65'C you should see that type of temp from the BIOS, if it shows anything under 50'C then you know your temps are wrong.

    And you should not need to get a new heatsink, I bet your problem is the heatsink filled with dust and your hitting 65'C at load (or the paste is applied wrong), and its not "Oil" between the heatsink and CPU, you should probably go into detail as to how you last applied the heatsink

    The stock heatsink is not that great, but you should not have any type of problems unless your overclocking, it will probably keep your CPU a bit warm, maybe hitting 50'C under load, but if its properly installed and the computer as a whole (not just the inside) has proper ventilation it should be fine
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    You said you replaced old thermal paste - when you do that you need to thoroughly clean off the old paste, two types on one CPU is no good. There are dozens of methods recommended on various forums and websites, search around - personally, I used a slightly damp paper towel as my stock paste was apparently one of the easier types to remove. Just make sure the heatsync and processor are totally free of paste before you re-apply. There should be no bubbles or uneven areas in the paste, and you only need a tiny layer fully covering the surface of the CPU.

    Finally, make sure your heatsync is attached to your board properly.

    edman007, when I built my first computer I remember having issues with the CPU heatsync - I was hitting about 95 before it shut down and the processor was fine after I fixed the problem - so it is possible, though certainly not a good thing.
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    There is no way those numbers are right, a laptop CPU will get permanently damaged at ~105'C, if this is a desktop your system will generally be unstable at 60-70'C, temps like 90'C will make any desktop CPU literally smoke and would have long ago stopped functioning, on a desktop your BIOS should generally make the system reboot before you hit 70'C

    Having stumbled on this thread via google (so no idea how old it is ), thought i'd add my tuppence.

    My D845 claims to be currently running at 104C as i type, on idle it won't fall below 75C, its been like this for the last week, but even when i bought the machine 18months ago i don't remember seeing a temp lower than 60C - this is in a roomy server case with good airflow and front and rear fan.

    104C should have turned my cpu into a smoldering mess by in 7 seconds never mind 7 days, so i guess the temp sensor is having a little meltdown of its own, but in any case the chip is definitely running too hot. About to put all the aforementioned advice in this thread into practice.

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