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    Server Room temperature


    Ok, I have a big server in a physicians office in a locked up room that houses drugs and the server. During the daytime, this inner room (with no windows) is usually at a chilling 65 F. It feels nice. However, on the weekends (and some nights)...the temperature really spikes up. Right now, the room is 82 F.

    A) Is this 82 F really bad for the server? Is the constant heating and cooling going to kill it??
    B) What temperature is considered catastrophic for the server?
    C) Would just a fan do to circulate air in the server room when it gets hot?
    D) If not, what type of cooling unit should I get? It's a small room...and has tiled ceilings. Is there any units that are easy to use, and require no draining?? I have no place to drain any water from a unit.
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    When is the server activity highest? If it is business related, you probably have highest loads on weekdays, lower on nights and weekends, which coincides well with your cooling.

    82F isn't intrinsically bad for the server, particularly if it isn't under much load. High ambient temperatures make it more difficult to cool the CPU, and high CPU temperatures lead to instability and shortened life. The same holds for video cards and hard drives.

    The temperature swing isn't a big deal either. If you were constantly cycling between freezing and thawing you'd have issues, but 65-80F shouldn't be a worry.

    CPU temperatures above 70C or so are where the cpu starts to reduce speed (if it has that capability) and above that things can start to die. Instability can occur at lower temperatures, but probably won't be an issue until around that temperature as well (depending what type of cpu you have)

    A fan could help keep the temperature down, circulating the air and brining in cooler (?) air from outside that room.

    Do you have air conditioning for the building? That would be the easiest way to keep those temps down. If not, maybe you could get something on the roof, so the condensation would be outside the building?

    HTH

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    • SANetworking agrees : HUGE HELP!
    --Dave--

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    Yeah...when the server has a high load...the room is like an icebox, and I love being in there!! When it's hot...it has absolutely no workload. Well, maybe 1-2%...but it's an intranet server, and the office is closed at night.
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    Devshed Frequenter (2500 - 2999 posts)

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    You should be fine in that case. If you have a fan around, putting it in there at night could give you peace of mind, but I see no problems with the way things are right now.
    --Dave--

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    Fantastic...you've made me much more at ease. I'll be able to sleep tonight!

    I might stick a fan in there, just for circulation. I cannot thank you enough!

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