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    Trying to cool my new computer


    I just got and built a new Pentium Dual Core computer. I have been building computers for quiet sometime now, but it seems that my CPU fan is spinning very sluggish. These are are all new parts. My Front cooling fan was running slow but i disconnected it and plugged it back in and it runs at a decent speed. My CPU runs at about 60-65C when not really doing much. I haven't used any of my big programs cause i just built it, but now I worry that when i will use them, this thing will have a meltdown or something. THat is if 60-65C is normal temperature for a dual core. Any suggestions on what this could be, and or how can I cool down my computer all together?
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    60-65c is pretty high for an intel dual core. i idle at 41 with a zalman heatsink, with the stock heatsink it came with i idled at around 50c or so. re-set the heatsink and try again. when a dual core gets around 70c id start to worry unless youre trying to set an overclock record of some sort and get a high score on your 3dmark.
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    Chances are, you're running a outdated power supply that cant produce enough power to run everything.

    I'd recommend getting a 550-600w power supply.

    My computer idles at about 28*C, and when under load, hits at most 49*C.
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    Get a new CPU cooler/heatsink.

    Get more case fans (120mm+ if you can). you should have every case fan blowing IN...and 1 blowing out the back.
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    you open the side of your computer and put a fan i front of the exposed parts. saves money, time. Or by big fans to your pc
    my baby dragon



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    Thumbs up


    Well,

    Even I am looking out for the same kind of information. Can anyone suggest me on this topic.
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    Originally Posted by Jack06
    Well,

    Cooling fans are used to cool the equipment and thrashing out the heat. Cooling the equipment and thrashing out the heat is referred as Active Cooling. These fans carry on the activity of cooling in various ways they either throw the heat out or transfer it to the heat sink which is just below the fan. Proper maintenance of heat is very much necessary else it may damage the performance of the computer. A cooling fan is not the only way or solution to keep the equipment cool or transfer the heat still cooling fans stand at par to any other solution. A cooling fan also helps in increasing the life span of the computer and helping it to give high performance.
    What is the point of your post?

    Also, you provide incorrect information. Fans do not transfer heat to the heat sink. They move cold air over the warm heat sink to cool it off, therefor cooling whatever is attached to the heat sink (CPU being the biggest example)
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    Originally Posted by Timmyfox
    I just got and built a new Pentium Dual Core computer. I have been building computers for quiet sometime now, but it seems that my CPU fan is spinning very sluggish. These are are all new parts. My Front cooling fan was running slow but i disconnected it and plugged it back in and it runs at a decent speed. My CPU runs at about 60-65C when not really doing much. I haven't used any of my big programs cause i just built it, but now I worry that when i will use them, this thing will have a meltdown or something. THat is if 60-65C is normal temperature for a dual core. Any suggestions on what this could be, and or how can I cool down my computer all together?
    replace your CPU fan with water cooled type fan and add some auxiliary fan inside your CPU case
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    actually here is a cool idea that i did as a college project to help cooling your pc, after adding the fans you want, get a very sharp blade and make a small cut between every 10 lines in your data cables then finish separating the lines with your handsand place them over each others then cover with electrical tape to make tube looking cables which would make more room for air to move around but make sure you dont expose any of the data lines by accident.
    another trick is using some fancy silver based thermal paste on your heat sinks.
    but mainly you gonna need at least one more fan
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    When I first got my Intel Core2Duo and set it up, it was idling at around 56c, and under stress it was getting up to around 62c which I found too high.

    I'm running it now still with stock cooling, but without any problems. The only thing I had done was taking the CPU fan off and put some Arctic Silver on the CPU and putting the fan back on it.

    Arctic Silver is pretty expensive for the tiny tube you get, but you can use it 5 times, and it reduces the CPU temperature by about 10c. It's deffinately worth your money.
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    actually here is a cool idea that i did as a college project to help cooling your pc, after adding the fans you want, get a very sharp blade and make a small cut between every 10 lines in your data cables then finish separating the lines with your handsand place them over each others then cover with electrical tape to make tube looking cables which would make more room for air to move around but make sure you dont expose any of the data lines by accident.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&DEPA=0&Order=BESTMATCH&Description=IDE+Cable+Round&x=0&y=0

    Originally Posted by LDHosting
    When I first got my Intel Core2Duo and set it up, it was idling at around 56c, and under stress it was getting up to around 62c which I found too high.
    Which Core2Duo are you using, and do you have it overclocked? Your idle temperature is higher than most stock-cooled Core2Duos read at load.
    Last edited by Beleaguered; April 6th, 2009 at 11:34 AM.
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    Intel Core2Duo E6850 3.00 GHz and it's not overclocked. I've never had a lot of luck with stock cooling on its own, and my big Fatality CPU fan did not fit onto my motherboard because I lost a piece
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    Originally Posted by LDHosting
    Intel Core2Duo E6850 3.00 GHz and it's not overclocked. I've never had a lot of luck with stock cooling on its own, and my big Fatality CPU fan did not fit onto my motherboard because I lost a piece

    Sheesh, those are some nasty idle temps then. Personally, I would work on improving case air flow and making sure the proper amount of thermal paste is applied until you start seeing idle temps closer to 40*C. If the temps you have work for you, then they work. They just seem a bit high. Intel's newer chips have a pretty good TDP compared to their older chips, and the stock cooling is decent.

    I live in an area that sits just below 100*F during the summer, and I don't think I've ever seen either of my Core2Duos (Q6600 @ 2.2ghz stock and the E6850 in another box elsewhere) break 45*C idle in non AC'd rooms.
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    Right now it idles at 46c and under heavy load it doesn't go over 50c thanks to the Arctic Silver I had put on. The temperatures barely move in the summer when it's 33c (93f) in this small room, so at the moment I think it's fine.

    Once it starts reaching 55c under load because of dirty fans etc. I might look into getting a new Zalman CPU fan. I can't seem to get used to the idea of water near electronics no matter how safe watercooling is these days and Zalman is one of the best brands for CPU fans in my opinion.

    My old Fatality CPU fan was also Zalman, and it cooled the entire case to a point where my motherboard wanted to turn my case fans off. The only thing you want to make sure before buying one is the amount of space you have in the case, because they're quite big, but very silent.

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