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    What is the real processor speed?


    what is the real processor speed ?

    its gets confusing when i see there are so many specifications out there
    whereas i thought a sempron 2800+ is running at 2.8GHz but it actually
    was only at 1.6Ghz???

    what is the real processor speed for the below ?

    where do i lookup on info pertaining to the real speed of the cpu ?

    sempron 2800+,
    athlon 3200
    athlon 64 x2
    pentium celeron 3.0
    pentium 4 3.2GHz
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    I think you will find everything you looking for http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/

    Merry christmas
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    Don't get too hung up on processor speed. That's why most processors are being named without the speed in the actual name. There's not that much of a difference between the actual speeds and slower speeds can actually outperform the faster speeds. It's not about raw GHz anymore.

    Most processors are over powered for the average user anyhow. It really depends upon your intended use of the machine as to what processor you should be looking for. Are you a gamer or an office type? Both?

    Not sure if you really wanted this information, but thought I'd pass it along.

    ---John Holmes...
    -- Cigars, whiskey and wild, wild women. --
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    ^ What Sep said.

    The CPU clock speed is a multiplier of the bus speed. This too affects things. But ultimately your performance will depend on how finely tuned the whole system is. I/O will continue to be one of the slowest aspects for the foreseeable future, so a faster hard drive might ultimately do more for you than a faster CPU, but that too depends on what you're doing with it.

    Also you can overclock most new builds fairly easily. I usually do not overclock, but I sure do when I want to render an animation sequence that's going to take all night long. OTOH overclocking will make your system less stable, so you should expect it to crash (more) often as a matter of course if you do that.

    But to directly answer this

    where do i lookup on info pertaining to the real speed of the cpu ?
    Every manufacturer has CPU specifications. This will tell you specifically the expected bus speed, CPU clock speed, expected operating temperature range, and many other factors. I've never bought a CPU for my own build without referring to this, nor have I ever failed to easily find this info sheet by checking the manufacturer's website (e.g. intel).
    medialint.com

    “Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.” - Dr. Seuss
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    Originally Posted by medialint
    Also you can overclock most new builds fairly easily. I usually do not overclock, but I sure do when I want to render an animation sequence that's going to take all night long. OTOH overclocking will make your system less stable, so you should expect it to crash (more) often as a matter of course if you do that.
    only if you take them past their limits .

    careful overclocking with benchmarking to check for instability and then dropping back a little will give just as stabler performance as stock. true, some wild OC's will lead to BSOD, system hangs, and math errors, but that's why you bench them. if things crop up wrong, take it back down a step or two and try again.

    it's all about finding the limits of your own chips.

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