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    Suggestion of CPU for programming usage mostly.


    Yeah I already hear you saying something like : "You don't need fast CPU for programming ...etc". But ...

    I'm mostly doing web development with Perl. Which means that I usually have following programs started :

    - Apache
    - MySQL
    - Winamp
    - Dreamweaver
    - Editor (various Perl editors)
    - PhotoShop
    - MySQL admin or similar Access-like app
    + lot's of usual stuff like anti-virus, firewall ...etc.

    And all that makes Windows sloppy, lazy and/or slow ...

    Some suggested an dual processor would solve my problems. So I was trying to find some dual processor solution. An older one (used) PIII range as money is an issue. But nothing can be found locally and most EBay sellers don't ship to Europe anyway.

    Current dual processor (Xeon or Opteron) computers are way out of my range so basically it ends up on :

    + AMD 64 3000+ (socket 939 version) that could latter be changed for dual core when prices for it drop.

    + Intel P4 ~ 3Ghz, with Hyper Threading (similar price to AMD). HT seems like something that would make work with many apps smoother. But it's not 64bit and upgrade would mean MB and RAM change ...

    PS I've just noticed an ad of local computer store. Seems they have P4 64Bit with HT. And whole computer is same price as AMD 64bit at same speed (other parts are same except MB of course).

    So if Hyper Threading really helps with multitasking I would say my choice is made.
    Last edited by techcode; November 6th, 2005 at 06:12 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Hyperthreading can help with multitasking if the programs can take advantage of it. Its not as good as an actual dual core though.
    I'm going to also mention that having that many programs open and being sluggish is probably more of a memory shortage than a cpu problem. Your apps aren't compiling or doing that sort of number crunching which would benefit from more processing power, and adding more ram would likely improve the responsiveness. What are your current system specs?
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    Hyperthreading can help with multitasking if the programs can take advantage of it. Its not as good as an actual dual core though.
    Yes I understand that it's not even near the same thing - during my high school (Electrical Engineering, Electronics dept.) we learned a bit of CPU arhitecture.

    What I don't know is how HT behaves in real world.

    The other day I read somewhere about neat software which enables you to control on which CPU you want to execute some process/app.

    I'm going to also mention that having that many programs open and being sluggish is probably more of a memory shortage than a cpu problem
    Yeah know that too That's why I'm planing to save a bit on other things and get more/faster RAM.

    What are your current system specs?
    Well for now I have it setup this way :

    PII 400 Mhz 384MB of RAM runs WinXP, Apache 2 and MySQL (FM radio too).
    In LAN with :
    PIII 850 Mhz 256MB of RAM also WinXP and all "developer" tools. This one is an Laptop (Compaq Armada m700) and upgrading it isn't that easy nor money efficient
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    So really you are building a new computer. I would personally go with the socket 939 amd, and get a dual core when you can. AMD generally has a better price/performance ratio. Load up on the ram. For as much multitasking as you're doing, get a gig or more.
    If you don't plan to upgrade the cpu later though, the P4 with HT might be slightly better, but again, the real important part is the RAM. More RAM = better performance with more programs open.
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    That's what I was thinking - but then I heard that AMD also intends to change the socket during next year to one called M2. So it might end in me not upgrading the CPU to dual core if price doesn't drop enough in the mean time. In that case Intel with HT would be better.

    Anyway, what s939 motherboard would you pick? Something with reasonable price ...

    Then again - I could simply wait a bit longer, save some additional cash and then buy M2 version ...
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    If they do change the socket, the "obsolete" ones will get cheaper. In the computer arena, if you always waited for the next best thing to arrive, you'll never stop waiting. A current amd or pentium with a gig of ram will be such a gigantic step up from what you have now, and you should then be set for several years to come.
    I don't have personal experience with current amd mobo's. I like the big players: Asus, DFI, Gigabyte, Abit. Look on anandtech, tom's hardware, etc to get some comparo's.
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    I would respectfully disagree. The intel will perform 90% of apps (not including games) a lot faster. The hyperthreading can also come as a benefit when you're surfing the web while writing an application. Also, all LGA 775 Pentium 4 processors are 64-bit enabled with the EM64T technology. Additionally, P4 also has xD technology to prevent buffer overruns. Sounds like the most important aspect here is to get a lot of ram.
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    I don't exactly agree with 0000 though.

    Hyperthreading is only 30% efficient at its best. You can't rely on HT for the best performance..or say it will change things drastically for you.

    And how can you neglect motherboard here? Plus the speed of FSB?
    AMD with HyperTransport has better solution for those bottlenecks at present at least...my bet would be going for 939 chipset AMD. Without even a second thought.

    Get an ASUS A8N SLI motherboard with it...or DFI nF4 Ultra Infinity....with 1Ghz FSB!! Add 1 gig or RAM to it...and you've got a kicka$$ rig by your side...
    Last edited by t3j45; November 13th, 2005 at 03:50 AM.
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    The pentium 4 can have speeds up to 1066 MHz FSB as well, which ever way you go, if you can afford it, go for 2 Gb of ram, if possible, it may help when running heavy compilers.
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    Not saying that Intel stuff wont work at higher FSBs..saying that it is not only the proc that will drive the system..you need a good combo as whole. And HT is not the cure of all problems...
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    High FSB Intels are also very expensive... probably out of the price range here. Also note that to get Intel has to "Quad-Pump" the FSB... kinda like DDR on steroids I guess, they don't say how it's done, but AMD and others in the past have claimed it creates some trouble with latency or something. AMD doesn't have that problem, plus not only is the FSB important, AMD doesn't have to run RAM traffic through any bridges, which really helps latencies and speed. Plus newer A64s support unofficial RAM dividers, meaning it's possible to buy say DDR500 RAM and with some A64 chips run it at DDR500 without overclocking the processor or anything else.



    I'd have to look up some benchmarks... haven't found too much yet except for Visual Studio .NET, in which the A64s slaughter the P4's - to the tune of 33% faster. May not seem like too much, but consider at the time that the slowest A64 was beating the fastest P4...


    Multitasking brings something new to the equation. HyperThreading will help there, but when trying to execute that many threads at once might make problems for it too. If you have that many open at once though... you aren't actually using them all at once, right? They may be open, but not all active? That would really play into the equation.
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    Originally Posted by archnaid
    High FSB Intels are also very expensive... probably out of the price range here. Also note that to get Intel has to "Quad-Pump" the FSB... kinda like DDR on steroids I guess, they don't say how it's done, but AMD and others in the past have claimed it creates some trouble with latency or something. AMD doesn't have that problem, plus not only is the FSB important, AMD doesn't have to run RAM traffic through any bridges, which really helps latencies and speed. Plus newer A64s support unofficial RAM dividers, meaning it's possible to buy say DDR500 RAM and with some A64 chips run it at DDR500 without overclocking the processor or anything else.



    I'd have to look up some benchmarks... haven't found too much yet except for Visual Studio .NET, in which the A64s slaughter the P4's - to the tune of 33% faster. May not seem like too much, but consider at the time that the slowest A64 was beating the fastest P4...


    Multitasking brings something new to the equation. HyperThreading will help there, but when trying to execute that many threads at once might make problems for it too. If you have that many open at once though... you aren't actually using them all at once, right? They may be open, but not all active? That would really play into the equation.
    I'd have to see those benchmarks, I'm a little skeptical that that would win by that much in VS.net, and the lowest beating the fastes. Something seems tainted to me there. I don't know, though, I will admit, it may be me, as I've tried on several equations to use AMD processors, and I just feel faster, and more comfortable on Intel processors.
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    Here's one from X-Bit; I didn't pay enough attention earlier, this was done with only the then-new s939 processors and a 3400+, which I think was s754. Even though this doens't go all the way down the scale, the 3400+ - by the PR rating should be equal to a 3.4GHz P4 - easily beats all three 3.4GHz competitors, including a P4 EE. Extra cache helps, as they mention, but even with the then-whopping 2MB of L2, the P4EE was 28 seconds slower than the 3400+ and 23s slower than the 3500+ (disparity between the 3400+ and 3500+ is probably explained by cache size).

    Here's a good bench from AnAnd. The A64s clearly dominate this test, even in single-channel RAM mode. Only a 3.8GHz P4 570, P4 3.4EE, P43.46EE, and a P-M 755 could best the 3000+ (1.8GHz) A64. Otherwise, AMD swept the test. So, to get an Intel to beat AMD at VS.net compiling, either shell out $800+ for an EE or ~$600 for a 3.8GHz 570 to beat an AMD chip that costs $135 on NewEgg.

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