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    Laptop Processor Upgrade


    I consider myself to be fairly technology inclined, though I find myself in a bit of a hard spot when it comes to this problem.

    I purchased a Lenovo Y510 through Intel Retail Edge (A program for retailer associates to get gear for cheap in exchange for learning about their product.)

    The specs are as follows:
    Processor: Intel T5750 (2.0GHz)
    RAM: 4GB DDR2 800MHz
    HDD: 250GB 5200 RPM Hitachi

    I am getting my hands on a Signature Edition of Windows 7 Ultimate and would like to upgrade, but I noticed my Laptops processor is slightly lacking in terms of features.

    Mainly of course, VT (Virtualization Technology) - One of the main reasons to own 7. (XP VT)

    Anyways, I found out that my processor is 667Mhz FSB, and is Socket P or 478-pin Micro FCPGA.

    On Intels website it suggests that this processor is NOT embedded and therefore can be removed. Albeit it being costly ~$200, I would want to go through with this should it be possible.

    My concern is of compatibility.
    What factors go into upgrading aside from socket?

    Say the MB max FSB is 667MHz, what happens should I select a 1066MHz processor? Will it bottleneck, or what if it's a slightly different voltage? What if it runs at a different Wattage / Lower or Higher? (I know Lower = Less power consumption) - I just want to know WHAT I need to know before I go ahead and make a purchase.

    I have disasembled and built numerous computers / desktops. I used to work for Circuit City and was a Lead Tech. Processor removal / upgrades (In a Laptop) are just foreign territory for me and I would prefer to KNOW what I'm walking into rather than going in blind.

    Normally anyone asking me for advice I would recommend to just leave it be and buy something with a bit more punch already built in...but I am fond of this laptop, and aside from the Intel GMAX3100 Integrated card, it is the best laptop I have ever owned.

    If I could get a spec of my motherboard I would, but I'm still working on that...

    Let me know what you guys think!

    I was looking at the Intel T78000 BTW - When on Tech Support for Lenovo they told me that was the highest processor this model came with (At the time) I am clueless if the MB was simultaneously upgraded when they used the other processor.
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    If I could get a spec of my motherboard I would, but I'm still working on that...
    I would definitely not do anything at all before making sure you have the right specifications for your motherboard.

    I am clueless if the MB was simultaneously upgraded when they used the other processor.
    A lot of time when you change the processor in a laptop the motherboard is also swapped out, which is why you should get the specifications before doing anything.

    Normally anyone asking me for advice I would recommend to just leave it be and buy something with a bit more punch already built in
    I recommend that same thing to you.

    Say the MB max FSB is 667MHz, what happens should I select a 1066MHz processor?
    It either won't work at all or the processor will underclock itself by 37%. The underclock might even put the speed of the new processor at less than that of the original. Depending on your motherboard you could potentially overclock the FSB, but it's very unlikely that you could overclock it up to 1066Mhz. The more you overclock the FSB the more you mess with other components that are tied into the motherboard unless your motherboard is specifically designed for overclocking and has separate clocks for the FSB and the other components. Given that your board is a laptop board that is very unlikely, but is another reason to get the specs for your board.

    what if it's a slightly different voltage? What if it runs at a different Wattage / Lower or Higher?
    As long as the processors use the same socket I think you're ok as far as the voltage goes. You're ok as far as wattage goes as long as the motherboard and power supply support the maximum power requirement of the processor.


    Anyway, I wouldn't recommend doing this and I would strongly recommend against doing it if you can't afford to destroy the laptop.
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    Originally Posted by E-Oreo
    I would definitely not do anything at all before making sure you have the right specifications for your motherboard.


    A lot of time when you change the processor in a laptop the motherboard is also swapped out, which is why you should get the specifications before doing anything.


    I recommend that same thing to you.


    It either won't work at all or the processor will underclock itself by 37%. The underclock might even put the speed of the new processor at less than that of the original. Depending on your motherboard you could potentially overclock the FSB, but it's very unlikely that you could overclock it up to 1066Mhz. The more you overclock the FSB the more you mess with other components that are tied into the motherboard unless your motherboard is specifically designed for overclocking and has separate clocks for the FSB and the other components. Given that your board is a laptop board that is very unlikely, but is another reason to get the specs for your board.


    As long as the processors use the same socket I think you're ok as far as the voltage goes. You're ok as far as wattage goes as long as the motherboard and power supply support the maximum power requirement of the processor.


    Anyway, I wouldn't recommend doing this and I would strongly recommend against doing it if you can't afford to destroy the laptop.
    I know what my Bios is, but that probably wont help.
    I just checked to see if anything else

    Just downloaded EVEREST Hardware identifier.

    Field Value
    Motherboard Properties
    Motherboard ID 64-0100-009999-00101111-012009-Crestline$SPDY0001_BIOS DATE: 01/20/09 VER: 06CN33WW
    Motherboard Name Lenovo Invalid

    Front Side Bus Properties
    Bus Type Intel AGTL+
    Bus Width 64-bit
    Real Clock 167 MHz (QDR)
    Effective Clock 667 MHz
    Bandwidth 5333 MB/s

    Memory Bus Properties
    Bus Type Dual DDR2 SDRAM
    Bus Width 128-bit
    DRAM:FSB Ratio 10:5
    Real Clock 333 MHz (DDR)
    Effective Clock 667 MHz
    Bandwidth [ TRIAL VERSION ] MB/s

    Chipset Bus Properties
    Bus Type Intel Direct Media Interface

    Motherboard Manufacturer
    Company Name Lenovo
    Product Information http://www.lenovo.com/products/us/en
    BIOS Download http://www.lenovo.com/support/us
    Driver Update http://driveragent.com?ref=59
    BIOS Upgrades http://www.esupport.com/biosagent/index.cfm?refererid=40


    Update:

    Interestingly enough, another hardware program I downloaded suggests that the max supported frequency is 997MHz per Core.

    I assume this to be a fallacy, no?
    This came up using HWiNFO32
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    It looks to me like Lenovo probably rebranded a board. It could be a custom board but I doubt it. The Motherboard ID probably means something to them, but it wouldn't be helpful to an independent trying to figure out what type of board it is. You might be able to find out what type of board it is by trying to locate a physical model number stamped on the board itself. Rebranding normally does not go so far as the modify the physical components. I think it unlikely that any hardware identifier tool will give you useful information though.

    I have never seen a FSB speed quoted as "per core" before and neither 997Mhz nor any of its multiples are a standard FSB speed.
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    Originally Posted by E-Oreo
    It looks to me like Lenovo probably rebranded a board. It could be a custom board but I doubt it. The Motherboard ID probably means something to them, but it wouldn't be helpful to an independent trying to figure out what type of board it is. You might be able to find out what type of board it is by trying to locate a physical model number stamped on the board itself. Rebranding normally does not go so far as the modify the physical components. I think it unlikely that any hardware identifier tool will give you useful information though.

    I have never seen a FSB speed quoted as "per core" before and neither 997Mhz nor any of its multiples are a standard FSB speed.
    The program was a bit buggy.
    I sorted out the issue, I had some power settings changes and it was displaying the actual speed of the cores.

    But it wasn't labeled as such. :\

    Go figure.

    I'm going to try to get my hands on a Lenovo HMM - though it may be difficult since they only have them available to the public on Thinkpad models.

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