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    General CSS Help required


    Having coded websites from home for nearly 20 years (with no education) and after 34 years in computers I realised that organising layout with html tables is not how it is supposed to be done. Even if it can be done with tables and nesting tables in tables and a lot of thought into things like colspan it quite often fouls up resulting in hours of problem solving. I am not where I would like to be with CSS skills but have decided to migrate my websites to css layouts from table layouts. My first impression is if "css" could sing it would be singing "Anything you can do I can do better" at "tables".

    I signed up here yesterday and received helpful answers within hours.

    I have always marvelled at how so many people are prepared to help total strangers in many different areas. I was a prolific usenet user (asking, answering and discussing a variety of issues and topics) in the 90's and early 2000's. It really does give hope for the human race that otherwise seems to be full of prejudice and discrimination. People often say irl but sometimes I wonder if our internet collectivness is not more true to human values than the terroism and violence that take up so much of our news screens today. As a newbie to css and this forum I would not want to overstep the mark and ask too many daft questions over the coming weeks. (I have 3 websites to recode and a new one to set up).

    My question is a general one about CSS Help.
    Can anyone can point me in the way of some good tutorials and maybe a couple of books I can order? I'd like to get most of the CSS way by myself and just ask the occasional question in these forums.
    Last edited by GarryJones61; September 15th, 2013 at 06:20 AM. Reason: Better title
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    Designing with Web Standards


    When ever I write markup, css and javascript I always ask myself:

    Is my markup semantically correct?
    Is my css scalable?
    Is my content accessible to all browsers and devices?

    If you follow these rules you will do alright.

    This book changed the way I think about html and css. It really is the perfect starting point for designing on the web.

    Designing with Web standards

    The toughest part about starting with css I think is getting a grasp on how floats and positioning work. Once you have that down, things become a lot easier.

    and this is also key:
    Do Websites need to look the same in every browser
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    Confirmation please


    Originally Posted by Paul-Ninja
    Designing with Web standards
    I noticed that this is the 3rd edition of the book and it was published in 2009. Should I be wary of following a book that is four years old? Has there been any major new innovations in css and html5 since the book was published?

    Would other similar books published more recently be better? If so can anyone point me in that direction.

    Cheers for any help
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    Welcome to DevShed Forums, GarryJones61.

    While technology updates have added features, the fundamentals have not changed much. I read the 2nd edition of "Designing with Web standards" and didn't find it all that useful, mainly because it spent too much time pushing XHTML (so I was continually distracted by my disagreements with the author). I hope the 3rd edition tones that down since XHTML is no longer considered a replacement for HTML.

    Here are some excellent sites to check out:
    Bulletproof HTML: 37 Steps to Perfect Markup
    http://www.cssbasics.com/
    http://www.css-101.org/
    http://learnlayout.com/
    http://www.htmldog.com/
    Integrated Web Design: CSS Beyond the Retrofit
    http://www.cssnewbie.com/
    W3Fools: A W3Schools Intervention
    BrainJar.com: Using Style Sheets
    http://css.maxdesign.com.au/
    http://css-tricks.com/

    Originally Posted by Paul-Ninja
    Is my css scalable?
    Paul, would you please explain what you mean by "scalable" in this context? Do you mean "namespacing" styles to avoid conflicts between "modules"?

    Originally Posted by GarryJones61
    Having coded websites from home for nearly 20 years (with no education)
    Pretty much all experts in HTML and CSS have not taken formal education in them. What matters is frequently spending time learning new things.

    Comments on this post

    • Nanomech agrees : Thanks for the links!
    Spreading knowledge, one newbie at a time.

    Check out my blog. | Learn CSS. | PHP includes | X/HTML Validator | CSS validator | Common CSS Mistakes | Common JS Mistakes

    Remember people spend most of their time on other people's sites (so don't violate web design conventions).
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    Originally Posted by GarryJones61
    Can anyone can point me in the way of some good tutorials and maybe a couple of books I can order? I'd like to get most of the CSS way by myself and just ask the occasional question in these forums.
    There is no need to order for books, just Google it, and you will find plenty of tutorial websites. And also YouTube is the best source of tutorials.
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    Originally Posted by JackSmith012
    There is no need to order for books, just Google it, and you will find plenty of tutorial websites. And also YouTube is the best source of tutorials.
    One thing though is that the average book seems to be of higher quality than the average website that claim to teach these things. And one advantage of (print) books is that you can always see the publication date. Many websites don't indicate when their content was written and so unsuspecting beginners have no clue that the content has been outdated for a long time.
    Spreading knowledge, one newbie at a time.

    Check out my blog. | Learn CSS. | PHP includes | X/HTML Validator | CSS validator | Common CSS Mistakes | Common JS Mistakes

    Remember people spend most of their time on other people's sites (so don't violate web design conventions).

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