Thread: Using Oracle

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    Using Oracle


    Hi ppl.
    Yesterday I've heared that one can download (DL) an Oracle database prog. for home use. So (with shaking hands) I went to their homepage, full with excitment and wanted to DL this database application but there I incountered a problem: they have too many products!! :-) and I don't know which one is the one for me.
    My story is this - I want to learn to work with databases so I asked a friend of mine and he told me : " forget mySQL, take Oracle" so I want to give it a try with oracle but I don't know which application to DL out of the so many they have.
    All I know is that I use a WIN2000 platform, that I'm new to database stuff and that the download thing will not be a problem (the files are very larg) because I have a DSL connection.
    Thank you all!
    Dekers.
    You haven't tried, you haven't lived
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  3. Modding: Oracle MsSQL Firebird
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    You have to download Oracle 9i Personal or the older (smaller download) 8i Personal from: http://otn.oracle.com/software/produ...l/content.html
    you should also subscribe to OTN (it's free) and get some docs.
    There are also excellent tools like Toad or TORA to help you using it.
    BUT, if you are a db novice, you should start with mysql or firebird or mssql, as they are much easier to use.
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  5. Wiking
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    I agree with pabloj here, Oracle probably isn't the most appropriate db to start with if you want to learn about databases. It's like deciding that you want to do mountain climbing and start off by climbing mount everest. Sure, it's not impossible, but it's one heck of a challenge...

    I don't know about setting up Oracle on Windows, but IMHO on Linux it's a pain...

    So I would suggest you start off with something smaller, not necessarily MySQL, but if you want to use Oracle one day, I think PostgreSQL is more appropriate as they have more in common.

    Just my 2 EUR

    //NoXcuz
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    advantage Vs. disadvantage


    First thanks for the informative information.

    What would you say are the advanteges I can get using Oracle Vs. mySQL? I would like to have an opinion of someone who knows both because I want to start with something and would like to get the most out of it. Will mySQL help me understand oracle better? Is it true that mySQL is better for sys. I call "dead systems", meaning sys which don't have much of "overwrite" requests but a more static sys which usually gets feeds but is not dynamic like the database of amazon.com ? Is it true that mySQL doesn't have lock_mechanism for it's tables?? What kind of disadvantages does mySQL Vs. oracle has? I guess the main question would be: "what do you want to do with it" so I would say: "I want to learn how to use a database. I still don't have a project to work on and I know this is one of the most important things if one wants to learn such a thing like programing or learning to work with a database... does anyone have any idea how I can get an idea for a project? does anyone know a good book for a beginner which leads one through his first steps in becoming a DB proff. ?? either for mySQL or for oracle?
    Many Thanks!
    Dekers
    You haven't tried, you haven't lived
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    about PostgreSQL


    Thanks for the tip.
    On one hand I don't want to use bad DB which wouldn't really give me something for life but on the other hand I don't want to try and bite something which is bigger than my stomach and than just get frustrated and loos any interest in the subject... because I can't really try all of the possibilities (that will take me monthes...) I'm happy to get the opinion of others in that matter.
    Can PostgreSQL be installed on Windows2000? I intend to install Linux SUSE 8.0 sone day but intill than I would like to work with a DB on windows (which is a system I already know....)
    Tanks! Dekers.
    You haven't tried, you haven't lived
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  11. Wiking
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    PostgreSQL on Windows -> http://www3.us.postgresql.org/docs/faq-mswin.html
    It's supposed to work, though it's mainly intended for a *nix environment...

    As you say yourself, I think that Oracle might be too big of a bite when you're new to databases. And thus complicate things so much that you don't ever want to see it again. It is however as great as it is expensive, but the main audience is bigger companies with greater demands. For personal use without a dedicated purpose, I think it's hard to motivate why you should go for Oracle.

    When you say learn about databases, what is it that you want to learn?
    Is it the SQL-language that you want to master? Or the art of setting up and tweaking databases? Or designing databases for specific purposes? Or the internal works of a database? Or just the general use of databases? Coz there's a lot going on beneath the surface of a database... And trying to master each of the above (and some other areas) of Oracle will certainly take a few years...

    That's why it might be easier to start off with a less complicated database, with less advanced options and techniques that might scare you off before you've even begun penetrating it. There are always commands, functions, and different ways of handling stuff that are unique to each database. And deciding to start off with the database that probably has most options available, is a tough one.

    If you start with someting like MySQL, there are not too many bells and whistles available, which can make you focus on understanding the general works of a database. Though MySQL is limited compared to Oracle, they do have things in common. And PostgreSQL has more in common with Oracle than MySQL has with Oracle, which is why you maybe should use Postgres instead if you're aiming for Oracle in the future.

    Some things that Oracle has that MySQL hasn't:
    transaction support
    subqueries
    stored procedures
    views
    triggers
    a big appetite for hardware...

    But those things (and others) are not necessarily disadvantages, especially if you don't know how to use them. The main thing to consider is what do you want to use it for?
    The most important thing, as you say yourself, is to set up a goal that you want to achieve. Then decide what means you need in order to get you there. So saying that you want to know how to use Oracle is kinda starting at the wrong end of things, unless if the goal is to master Oracle...

    Installing SuSE8.0 sounds like a good idea, no matter what database you decide to use.

    As for books about SQL/databases, O'Reilly has some book(s) that are considered to be good, mostly general but some targeted at specific dbs. Not sure about MySQL though.

    //NoXcuz
    UN*X is sexy!
    who | grep -i blonde | date; cd ~; unzip; touch; strip; finger; mount; gasp; yes; uptime; umount; sleep
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  13. Modding: Oracle MsSQL Firebird
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    Really, start with MySQL, it installs easily on Win, it has good ODBC and jdbc drivers, it's well documented and on the web you can find plenty of articles. You can start with it for queries, indices, user privilege management, and many other things like replication. Then you'll be able to switch to Firebird or Postgresql if you are interested in triggers, stored procedures and subqueries.
    Remember that many features of Oracle like tablespaces, rollback segments, dblinks, materialized views ... are something that is fully understood only in production-like environment and not on your home pc.
    Hope this helps!
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    Thank you


    I wanted to thank you all for giving me this information.
    I call it "soft information" one can't find it that easyly because it contains personal opinions of ppl and self impression.
    Thanks you very much you've helped me a lot... and saved me the DLoad of 650MB
    Dekers.
    You haven't tried, you haven't lived

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