#1
  1. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    India
    Posts
    110
    Rep Power
    1

    Delphi or Pascal?


    Hello Everyone!

    I'm thinking of learning Delphi but I've heard good things about Pascal.

    Delphi was based on PASCAL, and it was created as a dialect of PASCAL, Object-PASCAL. I've heard that PASCAL is no longer used, but I'm not gonna use it for software-development.

    I've the following concerns about both languages:

    # If I learn PASCAL, Will learning other PASCAL Influenced Languages will be easier (Modula, Ada, Delphi)

    # Which one is more easier to learn? (For a beginner like me)

    # Which one is more fast (in terms of runtime)?

    Please give an answer based on these points.

    Thanks
  2. #2
  3. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1
    Rep Power
    0
    Lazarus is a delphi work alike and a nice place to learn pascal.
  4. #3
  5. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    India
    Posts
    110
    Rep Power
    1
    Originally Posted by hexman
    Hello Everyone!

    I'm thinking of learning Delphi but I've heard good things about Pascal.

    Delphi was based on PASCAL, and it was created as a dialect of PASCAL, Object-PASCAL. I've heard that PASCAL is no longer used, but I'm not gonna use it for software-development.

    I've the following concerns about both languages:

    # If I learn PASCAL, Will learning other PASCAL Influenced Languages will be easier (Modula, Ada, Delphi)

    # Which one is more easier to learn? (For a beginner like me)

    # Which one is more fast (in terms of runtime)?

    Please give an answer based on these points.

    Thanks
    Actually, Delphi (more specifically called Object-Pascal) was derived from the existing Pascal Programming-Language. Pascal was created by Niklaus Wirth in 1970 as an educational language, designed to encourage students to use structured-programming style in their code. Although it was efficient, it was not much practical and was only used to teach students. Pascal was also the main language used in Apple systems (notably Lisa). I've never used Pascal and never worked with any fellow developer who used Pascal, but from the views from the net and some talk with Turbo programmers, I've come to the conclusion that its more or less a legacy language and is hardly used in today's world.

    Turbo-Pascal developed as a separate dialect by Borland....

    Wait a minute?....

    Was I the one who asked these questions? , Lol! , that was a long time ago.

    Sorry, guys, now I know the answer, of course. Even now, I'm never gonna learn Pascal, back in the 90s there were 16bit systems, and I really doubt that there would be a compatible compiler for the plain old Pascal. I don't know from where I got this idea of learning Pascal back in that day.

    Although, I learnt a bit of Delphi (and it was a really easy and powerful language) to get rid of the VB-6 difficulties but then I realised that it was much more powerful than VB and required a much deeper knowledge of the language than the classic VB6. Even after learning it, I didn't used it much (besides creating a syntax-highlighting editor for SCM-Scripting) and I eventually left it because I didn't wanted to get stuck with Windows. I eventually went on to learn Java which was my first programming language (after VB6, but that hardly counts as a language), I migrated to linux and now I'm here. Now I've left all of that Pascal and Delphi syntax, but it still looks easier (and better) to me than Python. I'm currently learning Common-Lisp right now (another REALLY different language), then I'll learn Python and Perl. Delphi looks promising but its not portable off Windows, so I'm not gonna learn any of Pascal derivatives right now.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by hexman; September 19th, 2014 at 05:06 AM.
  6. #4
  7. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    156
    Rep Power
    3
    Then I believe you have missed Delphi development in the last, perhaps 3-4 years. Now you can write a single codebase to compile and run, natively, in Windows, iOS (Mac, iPad, iPhone), Android, and basically linux. For linux there is not official support for XE6 but Android and iOS themselves are basically variant of linux.
  8. #5
  9. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    India
    Posts
    110
    Rep Power
    1
    Originally Posted by Luthfi
    Then I believe you have missed Delphi development in the last, perhaps 3-4 years. Now you can write a single codebase to compile and run, natively, in Windows, iOS (Mac, iPad, iPhone), Android, and basically linux. For linux there is not official support for XE6 but Android and iOS themselves are basically variant of linux.
    You mean like C, where you can compile from source on any system, since a C compiler exists for almost every platform in the world or like Java or C# where an intermediate bytecode is run by a platform independent VM?

    Thanks.
  10. #6
  11. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    156
    Rep Power
    3
    I did tell "natively". So it's like C/C++, unlike Java or .NET languages. However the compilation still must be done in windows, since there is only Windows Delphi IDE.
  12. #7
  13. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    India
    Posts
    110
    Rep Power
    1
    since there is only Windows Delphi IDE.
    But I've heard that there's a compiler for linux systems called FreePascal (or something like that) which compiles to machine-dependent code. There's also an Open-Source IDE called lazarus for linux and windows, IIRC.
  14. #8
  15. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    156
    Rep Power
    3
    I was talking about Delphi. While FreePascal (FPC) is another Object Pascal compiler (and Turbo Pascal like IDE), but it is not Delphi. Although one of the main target of it developer is to be as compatible as Delphi. It is still a great project, though. Combined with Lazarus, you get Delphi like IDE. If I am not mistaken, Initial version of multiplatform Delphi was using FPC to compile to platforms beside windows.
    Last edited by Luthfi; September 19th, 2014 at 06:12 PM.
  16. #9
  17. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    India
    Posts
    110
    Rep Power
    1
    Aren't Delphi's Object-Pascal dialect and all the "other" Object-Pascal dialects, the same? I thought that Delphi was just an IDE (with its own compiler), like Lazarus and they used a common Object-Pascal dialect.

    However the compilation still must be done in windows, since there is only Windows Delphi IDE.
    So, Technically speaking, There is no way to build a Delphi Application on Linux, for Linux-Systems.
    Last edited by hexman; September 21st, 2014 at 02:28 AM.
  18. #10
  19. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    India
    Posts
    110
    Rep Power
    1
    I don't know why people use Delphi when there exist many languages that are better than it. Sounds vague doesn't it, let me clarify:

    C#- C# has better support than Delphi. Microsoft's Visual Studio supports C#, It has a major support for Windows and the .NET Platform. Its the chief language for developing on the .NET Platform, It has also support for Linux through the Mono framework. Its syntax is similar to C/C++ and almost identical to Java. It has a bigger developer base than Delphi, so finding a fellow developer is not difficult.

    Java- Java is arguably the most popular programming language in use today. Its used on numerous platforms and has a very large developer base. Java is continuously being used, although more for Client Side and Server Side programming. It has a similar syntax to C/C++ and C# (since C#'s syntax is derived from Java), that's why developers from other languages find it easier to learn it.

    And many other languages, but I listed the two because they're popular on Windows and I know about them.

    Thanks.

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo