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    Question I don't feel safe running this file - I need some expert advice


    I downloaded a couple .crt (cartridge) files for the vice commodore 64 emulator so I can learn assembly language by using the good ol' commodore 6502 processor. But I need an assembler so I downloaded these files. But I'm hesitant to open them because they look very suspicious.

    I'll do my best to translate from norwegian to english when explaining this file. OK. It has the file extension .crt and I assume that is short for cartridge (as in Commodore 64 cartridges) but Windows labels it as "security certificate" file type. And I see that it opens in the "shell extension for Crypto". This sounds very suspicious to me. I won't use this file until a get a knowledgeable person's opinion on this file. Also can you explain what this file does?

    EDIT: I deduced that with the file extension .crt that it likely stood for certificate. So I googled it and I was correct. Then for for security measures I made my own empty .crt file with notepad and YES it shows up as a legit "security certificate" file. I'm going to take my chances with this file as I'm itching to learn some machine code!

    But I reckon this might be a slick way for hackers to disguise a security virus? I'm quite interested on any opinions on that from anybody who knows more about this than me.
    Last edited by Chakotay; August 26th, 2014 at 03:25 PM.
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    "crt" is just an extension and that's just part of the file's name. Windows uses the extension to decide what the file is, without looking inside like other systems do, so it thinks the file is a certificate (and really, .crt is a certificate), but here that is not the case. You could rename it to ".cart" or ".cartridge" or ".qqqqq" and Windows will change its mind.

    It's fine. You may accidentally try to execute the file but, assuming the file isn't being malicious, Windows will fail to do anything with it because it's an invalid certificate file.
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    Originally Posted by requinix
    "crt" is just an extension and that's just part of the file's name. Windows uses the extension to decide what the file is, without looking inside like other systems do, so it thinks the file is a certificate (and really, .crt is a certificate), but here that is not the case. You could rename it to ".cart" or ".cartridge" or ".qqqqq" and Windows will change its mind.

    It's fine. You may accidentally try to execute the file but, assuming the file isn't being malicious, Windows will fail to do anything with it because it's an invalid certificate file.
    That's what I thought :0) I'm curious what other systems look inside the files. Does Linux and Mac look inside all files before they're executed?
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    No, and it's not even a rule of thumb that they do, just something that sometimes happens maybe.

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