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    Marketing majors, = pure common sense?


    Does anybody think marketing majors is a pure waste?

    I honestly think marketing is the psychology major of the COBM (college of business & management).

    I honestly picked up a marketing textbook at a bookstore, and looked through the chapters. It was like pure common sense and psychology.

    And then I even looked at a textbox on examples or applications, and it was on making a website. It said stuff like when you make a website, take into consideration the font color and font face, to attract customers or not.

    So, I think the electives of marketing majors (like finance, accounting) are itself more useful than marketing.

    Perhaps all the usefulness of marketing majors can be summarized in 1, 3-credit hour, class. Or even a CliffsNotes. And yet you can have a bachelor's, master's, and PhD in it.

    And yet, lots of businesses/corporations want to spend a lot of money on hiring someone that has a degree in marketing.

    Does anybody here want to defend marketing majors?
    Last edited by LostShadow; October 6th, 2017 at 01:02 PM.
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    Originally Posted by LostShadow
    I honestly picked up a marketing textbook at a bookstore, and looked through the chapters. It was like pure common sense and psychology.
    I looked through a programming textbook, and it was all just logic and procedure, so that means that anyone could be a programmer, there's no need for a degree.

    See, that just sounds silly too. There's a lot more to marketing then flipping through a single textbook somewhere.

    However... I have seen people in marketing that are slightly worse then useless, and at more then just marketing. It can be an "easy" degree to get, but to do well in it, you do need the brains to understand a whole lot more about it all then what you learn from any books.
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    Originally Posted by Catacaustic
    I looked through a programming textbook, and it was all just logic and procedure, so that means that anyone could be a programmer, there's no need for a degree.
    But that's not my argument. My argument wasn't "can you just read through a book and therefore not need the degree?"

    Philosophy, history, are all examples of majors where you can just hire someone who read a lof those books. But not majors like chemistry where there is a lab component.

    Originally Posted by Catacaustic
    See, that just sounds silly too. There's a lot more to marketing then flipping through a single textbook somewhere.

    However... I have seen people in marketing that are slightly worse then useless, and at more then just marketing. It can be an "easy" degree to get, but to do well in it, you do need the brains to understand a whole lot more about it all then what you learn from any books.
    Got any examples?

    I'd like to see some examples of applied marketing, actually.
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    Originally Posted by LostShadow
    But that's not my argument. My argument wasn't "can you just read through a book and therefore not need the degree?"

    Philosophy, history, are all examples of majors where you can just hire someone who read a lof those books. But not majors like chemistry where there is a lab component.


    Got any examples?

    I'd like to see some examples of applied marketing, actually.
    Reading the books doesn't mean you are good at something. Understanding it and being able to apply the theories in practice to get the desired results is what makes you good. A degree may or may not help with that depending on the person, but jsut reading stuff doesn't mean you can apply it in real life. As an example, I've read a whole lot of science article, journals, etc, and I have a pretty good understanding of a lot of things, but I wouldn't have any idea of what I'd be looking at in most labs. That's the difference. This applies in every discipline out there, not just "practical" ones like lab work, programming, architecture, etc. It's not the knowledge, it's the understanding behind the knowledge that counts.

    As for examples of applied marketing, just look pretty much everywhere. Newspapers, TV, online ads, social media. All of these are pretty much purely applied marketing. Some do it well, some not so well, but they are all there to market products and services.
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    Originally Posted by Catacaustic
    Reading the books doesn't mean you are good at something.
    Sure it does.

    There is no lab component in history or philosophy majors, so once you read books on history or philosophy, you can be an expert just from reading.

    Originally Posted by Catacaustic
    As for examples of applied marketing, just look pretty much everywhere. Newspapers, TV, online ads, social media. All of these are pretty much purely applied marketing. Some do it well, some not so well, but they are all there to market products and services.
    Isn't this all common sense? Psychology and philosophy.
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    Can you explain in further detail why you think it's common sense?
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    Originally Posted by cody_e
    Can you explain in further detail why you think it's common sense?
    Let's say I was hired to do market some product to another racial group of people, in another religion. If I'm not part of that ethnic group and such, to what extent am I am expert at trying to sell?

    Now if I were marketing something to cats - something that will appeal to cats. Naturally, it will be something that smells of cat food and such.

    But what we don't know much about, is what music appeals to cats. There was a recent Guinness World Records where scientists finally discovered music that is meaningful to cats. For example, cats generally ignore music made by humans for humans. Playing sad music on a frightened cat (to try to tone done) or playing angry music at a relaxed cat, ultimately have no effect on cats. But this Guinness world record was on someone finally produced a music that was meaningful to cats, it was like the vibrating the sound of sucking on milk and such, and then put some cello melody to it.

    -

    I've heard of something called business philosophy, which is where people consult to businesses about their philosophy, which could make them more liked by their customers.

    But if you try to cater to certain groups, I think you won't be liked by all. For example, something that tries to cater to both Christians and atheists at the same time may be hated by both. How bout something that tries to market to both genders?

    Imagine if I tried to open a store that really appeals to women, like using colors that appeals to women, which may or may not be appealing to men. Or by allowing shirtless guys in it. After all, most stores out there do not allow men to shop while shirtless. So if a store was known to allow but also encourage men to shop shirtless, couldn't that appeal for more women customers? But the downside to that is, certain men will be turned off by such a store, and shop elsewhere. Etc.

    What the hell do you learn in marketing?
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    Originally Posted by LostShadow
    Let's say I was hired to do market some product to another racial group of people, in another religion. If I'm not part of that ethnic group and such, to what extent am I am expert at trying to sell?

    Now if I were marketing something to cats - something that will appeal to cats. Naturally, it will be something that smells of cat food and such.

    But what we don't know much about, is what music appeals to cats. There was a recent Guinness World Records where scientists finally discovered music that is meaningful to cats. For example, cats generally ignore music made by humans for humans. Playing sad music on a frightened cat (to try to tone done) or playing angry music at a relaxed cat, ultimately have no effect on cats. But this Guinness world record was on someone finally produced a music that was meaningful to cats, it was like the vibrating the sound of sucking on milk and such, and then put some cello melody to it.

    -

    I've heard of something called business philosophy, which is where people consult to businesses about their philosophy, which could make them more liked by their customers.

    But if you try to cater to certain groups, I think you won't be liked by all. For example, something that tries to cater to both Christians and atheists at the same time may be hated by both. How bout something that tries to market to both genders?

    Imagine if I tried to open a store that really appeals to women, by allowing shirtless guys in it. After all, most stores out there do not allow men to shop while shirtless. So if a store was known to allow but also encourage men to shop shirtless, couldn't that appeal for more women customers? But the downside to that is, certain men will be turned off by such a store, and shop elsewhere. Etc.

    What the hell do you learn in marketing?
    What the hell do you learn in marketing? That marketing is more than advertising and your response shows that that's the only thing you think of. There's a lot more to marketing than just making ads. You have to select different market segments and then price and position your products to meet within the confines of that market segment. There's a whole bunch of other factors that aren't "common sense" until you learn them. Personally, my undergrad is in Technology Management and I have an MBA focusing in Technology Management, but the few marketing classes I've taken have made me realize there's way more to marketing than you think.
    Codeinated
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    Originally Posted by cody_e
    You have to select different market segments and then price and position your products to meet within the confines of that market segment.
    So, is that the economics law of supply and demand? Since economics is in the college of arts and sciences, then finance is the equivalent economics majors for the college of business management.

    So this is econ or finance.

    Originally Posted by cody_e
    There's a whole bunch of other factors that aren't "common sense" until you learn them. Personally, my undergrad is in Technology Management and I have an MBA focusing in Technology Management, but the few marketing classes I've taken have made me realize there's way more to marketing than you think.
    I hope so too.
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    So basically, what you are saying is that you don't understand the theory behind marketing, and it's all just easy. OK, lets see you do it.

    If your examples of playing cats music, and shirtless men running around a shop are the best that you can come up with, that shows exactly how little you really do understand.

    I'm almost the same background as cody_e is. I'm IT trained, but I've worked fr marketing companies for almost two decades now, and I see what goes on behind the scenes. The planning and process that goes into everything is thought out according to rules and experience. Absolutely nothing like "I read this in a textbook somewhere".

    While marketing may be more of a "soft" science (in that there's no hard-and-fast formulas like there is in engineering) there is a lot of complexity to it that you will only see after years of experience.

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    Originally Posted by Catacaustic
    So basically, what you are saying is that you don't understand the theory behind marketing, and it's all just easy. OK, lets see you do it.
    The funny thing is any job can be marginalized to something basic. I mean IT is all the time. "Well it's just hitting some keys in the right order." There's a lot more to jobs than most people think and you're also right with this. There's a lot of "grey area" knowledge that you just don't pick up from a textbook.
    Codeinated
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    Originally Posted by Catacaustic
    If your examples of playing cats music, and shirtless men running around a shop are the best that you can come up with, that shows exactly how little you really do understand.
    Okay, you guys aren't understanding my point, so I'll give an example.

    Suppose I'm CEO of my own company and I want to hire someone to best increase my profits. Revenue.

    Let's say I wanted to cater to Muslim people. Should I hire a Muslim consultant, or should I hire someone with a marketing degree?

    For example, did you know that Muslims take offense to dogs? Something in the Qur'an that causes Muslims to not like dogs.

    So if I decorate my stores with pictures of dogs, is that going to appeal to Muslim people?

    Most people already know that Muslims and Jews do not eat pork, so someone trying to start a business to appeal to Muslims/Jews most likely will not want pictures of pigs, or rhetorics involving pork.

    Technically, the best choice could be someone who is both Muslim and with a marketing degree, but if I had to choose between a Muslim only as a consultant, or a marketing degree, do you think a person with the marketing degree is the better choice?
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    Nope, just hire someone who knows what they are doing - they will probably have some qualifications in marketing ..
    The moon on the one hand, the dawn on the other:
    The moon is my sister, the dawn is my brother.
    The moon on my left and the dawn on my right.
    My brother, good morning: my sister, good night.
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    Originally Posted by LostShadow
    Okay, you guys aren't understanding my point, so I'll give an example.

    Suppose I'm CEO of my own company and I want to hire someone to best increase my profits. Revenue.

    Let's say I wanted to cater to Muslim people. Should I hire a Muslim consultant, or should I hire someone with a marketing degree?

    For example, did you know that Muslims take offense to dogs? Something in the Qur'an that causes Muslims to not like dogs.

    So if I decorate my stores with pictures of dogs, is that going to appeal to Muslim people?

    Most people already know that Muslims and Jews do not eat pork, so someone trying to start a business to appeal to Muslims/Jews most likely will not want pictures of pigs, or rhetorics involving pork.

    Technically, the best choice could be someone who is both Muslim and with a marketing degree, but if I had to choose between a Muslim only as a consultant, or a marketing degree, do you think a person with the marketing degree is the better choice?
    Someone with a marketing degree should be able to pick this stuff out right away and tailor the message accordingly.
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    Originally Posted by LostShadow
    Technically, the best choice could be someone who is both Muslim and with a marketing degree, but if I had to choose between a Muslim only as a consultant, or a marketing degree, do you think a person with the marketing degree is the better choice?
    I can't believe that you actually have to ask this...

    A marketing person may not know about something like that, but they'd know to research into it to find out before they did anything.

    Obviously someone that has previous experience in that particular field will have an edge, but professional marketers learn quickly, and can apply their previous knowledge to whatever job they are on at the time.

    If you wanted to go with your example, could you imagine what the results would be if you hired a builder to advertise nails, a butcher to advertise steaks, a scientist to advertise beauty products... Those people are all great at their respective professions, but they would make pretty useless marketing people unless they have training and experience in marketing.
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