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    Re: Invoking a new process??


    That was my understanding of ASP and PHP as well.
  2. #32
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    Thoughts on JSP/EJB/Servlet use


    I am still learning much of the stuff related to J2EE (which I believe is the umbrella under which JSP, JavaBeans, and Servlets lie), but I've always felt as though I wanted to learn and use the language that has the greatest number of features despite whether or not it's easy to use. After reading up on the J2EE environment, it's clear to me that ColdFusion, ASP, or another similar server-side scripting language is much easier to learn and use, but it obviously doesn't scale like J2EE. Because of the possibility of just about any Web site becoming very large and popular, wouldn't it be prudent to just go with a J2EE environment to begin with? This is my dilemma.
  4. #33
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    Re: Any hosting co's offering JSP w/Tomcat?


    I would highly recommend spinweb.net Not only will they take care of the JSP/Tomcat/MySQL/Postrgre.... They are competent developers as well just in case you get stuck. Their rates are very scalable - I in fact have my stuff hosted at $35 a month.
  6. #34
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    Re: Thoughts on JSP/EJB/Servlet use


    Yes J2EE is scalable. But every couple of years certain new technology immerges due to the lack of functionality of other existing languages. Sure, there maybe components of Java built to do these new tasks, but they may not be as easy to achieve comparing to the future newer languages.

    In a couple of years, the web technology maybe very different. J2EE can not posibly be the end to all. So yes, its scalable, but would be cost of extending new functionality with J2EE be worth it compare to newer technologies?

    Think about it: first comes static pages, then CGI/Perl, then ASP/CF/PHP/JSP. No matter how new and fast your current server is, it will be out dated in a couple of years. This is just the trend of the business.
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    Re: JSP vs. PHP


    Fahng,
    As far as i know there is only ONE provider for php, and since JSP is a reference implementation of sun's java server pages and since there are 10s of open source and vendor implementations out there, you will find variations in performance of JSP.Why dont you specify which servlet engine you have used to do the benchmarking.Download Resin or Orion and do the benchmarking if u havent already done so.The author of Resin(http://www.caucho.com) has already done some benchmarks on php Vs jsp and those benchmarks contradict what u have to say about PHP.

    Cheers
  10. #36
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    Re: RAM <> better ab resutls


    I have noticed that tomcat is very slow when accessed on the same computer as http://localhost:8080/ but when I try to access it from another computer as http://192.168.1.1:8080/ on a two computers home LAN, it is prety fast. Is there any reason for that? I have 128mb RAM and win98 on both.

    Regards,
    Lutfullah
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    Re: Tomcat=Slow, JSP=??


    I am a fairly experienced PHP dev and now that I am getting into JSP, I can say that for most simple uses php seems to be alot faster...This doesn't invalidate JSP in any way, however...Having the complete power of the Java API backing my web applications alone makes it completely worth it, scalabilty issues aside...
  14. #38
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    Re: JSP vs. PHP


    I haven't performed my own tests because I haven't enough proficiency in JSP, so the test I talked about are the ones I have read in the paper/internet press, including: independent tests, JSP's biased tests, PHP biased tests and Zope biased tests (and a few ASP sold, biased is too sweet). Obviously I'm talking about free platforms (in case of JSP JServ and Tomcat are the ones I know), if you pay you can accelerate not only JSP (with Resin ie) but PHP (with Zend compiler 4x faster) and other platforms I suppose.

    PD: I just noticed today your reply when I was doing a deep e-mail clean, sorry for the delay
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    Re: Figures...


    Hi,

    We are currently investigating J2EE based platform to build a web application. Previously we have used Broadvision for big stuff and PHP or ASP for little quick-wins. The question I'd like to ask of anyone is about EJBs. Do people feel that JSPs + Servlets are enough to implement large enterprise scale web applications with numerous back-links to legacy and ERP systems (Has anyone implement large scale projects using JSPs+Servlets only)? Or are putting EJB technology into the architecture much more superior in terms of code maintainabilty, productivity of programmers, performance. etc.
  18. #40
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    Re: JSP vs. PHP


    From purely a programming point of view... I have been programming in both PHP4 and Java for a while now, and personally I *MUCH* prefer PHP4.

    It is a lot easier to write, a lot faster to write (lines a minute, I'm not talking personally faster for me, I mean it *is* faster due to the programming construct and language constraints), and a lot easier to use. Sure, Java has its place (ie, there is a module for everything!) but in the world of web programming I really feel that PHP is far greater than Java/JSP.

    Robbo
  20. #41
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    Re: JSP vs. PHP


    I think the issue basically boils down to the following:

    How large is the site you're designing?

    I would recommend jsp for mid to large sites and php for smal to mid size sites

    Are you going to be seriously using MVC?

    I think jsp is designed for this style of code. php has me running in circles trying to implement this for a mid size site.

    How many people are going to be working on the site?

    jsp seems to give a much clearer boundary between view and control, thus seperating much of your presentation from your code. As jsp becomes more advanced, this should be a *major* plus. things like open custom made tags for production people to use will speed up development immensely and close the gap between jsp and php.
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  26. #44
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    Re: Re: JSP vs. PHP


    I've been playing around with the demos
    for Resin, and PHP with Apache is much faster (I haven't tried resin integration with Apache). Java in general in a bloated memory and processor hog, I would much rather use PHP possibly integrated with
    Servlets than to go with JSP. The big difference is like you said, PHP is just one, and JSP is a open standard adopted
    by many, however, PHP is de facto, is JSP
    de facto yet?

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