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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    great!


    Not only a good beginners tutorial but a nice refresher as well. I haven't touched SQL for a while now and a read through of this was a perfect reminder of all the basics.
  2. #2
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Execellent!


    Just what I was looking for...waiting for the second part!
  4. #3
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    test


    this is a test
  6. #4
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    enjoyed the article


    and i will be awaiting the next i am new to databases and have been learning sql this is great info in a clear and understandable tone. thanks
  8. #5
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Re: enjoyed the article


    Thnaks for the article, I am just starting with MySql.
  10. #6
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Great


    Great first article. <br>
    <br>
    I am new to MySQL and needed an introduction like this one. Very easy to follow, enjoyable.<br>
    <br>
    Thanks and looking forward to next articles in series.
  12. #7
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Multi-page articles


    I would love to have read this article, but really, really dislike having to read something in 6-sentence chunks, like this.

    I realize that this site wants to increase its number of clicks, but at what price?
  14. #8
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Re: Multi-page articles


    That's why you can click on the "Printer Friendly Version" link on the right side and see the entire article at once.
  16. #9
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Quick questions


    Frist off, good introductory article. Is it possible to use these commands on other db's from MS, IBM, or Oracle? Second is there a good book that takes you step by step on how to use a database from the ground up. Most books I have seen tend to only really focus on one database or another, and they all seem to be very different. It seems like just cause you know MS SQL doesn't mean you can admin an Oracle db.
  18. #10
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    test


    TEST IS WORKING
  20. #11
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Table size limit?


    It is a very helpful article for a beginner.
    <br>
    <br>
    However, I have a technique question to ask.
    <br>
    During the design time, one has to consoder efficiency and speed when using a database, how many records can a MySQL table hold? I understand that when the table becomes very very large, it will decrease the efficiency and speed to find a record. Does it improve the effeciency and speed to split one giant table into several tables? Then how to build the relation between the tables and other tables related to the giant table?
    <br>
  22. #12
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Re: Table size limit?


    MySQL can hold millions of records. Of course performance is going to depend on the number of records and the hardware you're running it on.

    There are a lot of things to consider. See, MySQL is a lot more complex than this article talks about. To speed up queries, you can create indexes on certain fields that speed up searching and sorting at the cost of incresed disk space.

    Things that effect performance include the complexity of the query (running a select * is a lot easier to do than complex joins on 6 tables), the index of those tables, and how well they're set up in the first place.

    The idea for me is to seperate the tables based on the data they store. In his example, why store movie information in the same table as user information?

    There's a billion ways you can break it up. You should try to find some articles on database normalization, which is the process of designing them efficiently. Try PHPBuilder.com for some more articles.
  24. #13
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Re: Quick questions


    Well, since most RDBMSs (Relational Database Management System) use SQL (Structured Query Language) they should be very similar. Most likely this article will be applicable to all SQL based RDBMSs. The actual administration functions of the db's can change though. It's the language you use to manipulate the data that's pretty much the same.

    Once you get into other systems, though, certain things work or don't work or work differently. Joins, transactions, etc. You have to get comfortable working with one, then when you move to another, read up on that one.

    As for books, I got the O'Rielly "MySQL and mSQL" and I didn't like it very much. I found the tutorials here and at other sites to be a bit easier to follow.
  26. #14
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Re: Multi-page articles


    I agree that it can get a bit annoying, but after having been in the internet content business, it's all too clear that it is necessary. W/out a large number of impressions/clicks, the site can't make enough money. You'd like to think that all quality web sites are making a hefty profit, but internet advertising is in a bit of a slump (to put it lightly) right now.
  28. #15
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    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    21rst century SQL


    Of course it is a good idea to talk about SQL but we should C-ify (make it look like C) SQL: it is unfortunately to COBOL-ish.
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