Thread: SVN, Subversion

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    http://stealthwd.ca
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    SVN, Subversion


    Hey everyone. I've been developing a website CMS for the company I work for. The core functionality is mostly finished and I think now would be a good time to get into using SVN.

    What I would ultimately like to do is have a repository for the CMS, then a very simple straight forward way send all the updates\changes to the sites based off the CMS. I have a little experience with SVN.

    I was hoping someone could recommend a good read for something like this, or shed some light on things I should be considering.

    Thanks
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    We use SVN and Tortoise. I jsut use it at the Windows Explorer level - right click the project root directory (on my C: drive), press COMMIT, and that's it, all changes saved, job done!

    We have a convoluted way that we produce release packages for deployment so I doubt that will be relevant to you, but I have a couple of general SVN suggestions:

    We use a spivvy DIFF tool. Whenever we COMMIT files SVN displays a list of the files it will "check in". We right click each file in turn, choose DIFF and compare against the previous version. This is a sort of self-peer-review and we review the code changes weve made before checking in in case that causes us to spot anything - like we accidentally deleted a large chunk of code, or changed a DEFAULT for debugging that we forgot to change back again.

    Similarly on CHECKOUT - you get a list of all files that are changed (i.e. newer on the server) and I personally right-click and DIFF each one to see what other people have changed (so Im the peer-review "gofa", in that respect).

    We always use UPDATE before we use COMMIT, the reason being that UPDATE will complain if there is a conflict between your local changes and the central code whereas COMMIT will attempt to merge the two, and the resulting space-time can be very hard to work out what you changed and what someone else changed. On UPDATE if we get a conflict we use DIFF (i.e. between my local version and the latest version in the repository) and I sort out the merging myself and then COMMIT that.
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    you need to read the redbook and install tortoise svn - thats the best way to start getting using to using a repos.

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