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    DNS Set Up with Bind


    Hi,

    I'm trying to set up a Windows Vista to operate as a DNS server to host my site on.

    Here's what I have:

    BIND9.9.1
    Wampserver2.2e that comes with: php5.3.13, httpd2.2.22-mysql5.5.24-32b(4)

    I'm just wondering do these go together like this?

    Everything "runs" not exactly sure if they are running correctly. Because one "Wamp" I think is trying to listen to port 80 and Bind is trying to listen to port 53.
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    Originally Posted by Lovepepper
    Hi,

    I'm trying to set up a Windows Vista to operate as a DNS server to host my site on.

    Here's what I have:

    BIND9.9.1
    Wampserver2.2e that comes with: php5.3.13, httpd2.2.22-mysql5.5.24-32b(4)

    I'm just wondering do these go together like this?
    Bind is separate from Wamp. You don't have to have bind to run wamp, and vice versa.

    If you post the domain, we can help you determine if it's running correctly. (Or if you'd rather, you can send me a message directly)
    "I don't need to get a life. I'm a gamer. I have lots of lives!"
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    I think I understand now.

    BIND is the DNS server.
    Wamp with Apache is the program that sends the web pages though BIND.

    I just get confused because I read someplace that your suppose to connect to the web on port 80. BIND seems defaulted to port 53 but Apache is defaulted to 80.

    So I thought I might be messing up. I just wonder should I make BIND connect with port 80 because that is standard?

    I'm an expert. hehehe

    I don't have a registered domain yet. just my ip. Will my IP help?

    I mostly need to know about what ports they are suppose to connect to the web with?
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    Btw

    I have a website it's just not registered yet. But it works very well on my local computer. I'm just setting everything up right now. I'm working on the zone and named files. BIND starts very well but it seems to be connecting to the wrong port.

    I'm using a router with a dynamic IP. I adjusted the router so that this computer has a static IP thou.
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    Originally Posted by Lovepepper
    I think I understand now.

    BIND is the DNS server.
    Wamp with Apache is the program that sends the web pages though BIND.

    I just get confused because I read someplace that your suppose to connect to the web on port 80. BIND seems defaulted to port 53 but Apache is defaulted to 80.

    So I thought I might be messing up. I just wonder should I make BIND connect with port 80 because that is standard?
    BIND is NOT web. Web, by default is port 80. BIND, by default is port 53. Generally speaking, if you change port 80 for web to another port, then you would need to type in http://www.domain.comort ... So, unless there is a reason for it, or some conflict, leave it as default.

    I don't have a registered domain yet. just my ip. Will my IP help?

    I mostly need to know about what ports they are suppose to connect to the web with?
    An IP can be fine, however, if it's a dynamic IP, you would need to know your IP to be able to connect to the web server, unless you set up a dynamic DNS name, such as with dyndns.org. If it's static, then again, you will need to know your IP, and memorize it.

    You don't need to buy a domain to host a webserver. You can use free dns services, again, such as dyndns.org. (There are numerous others, but this is just one I use on occasion). For just an IP, and a free domain name, you don't even need to set up BIND. You can have a webserver without BIND. BIND is used to associate a domain name to an IP. If you don't have a domain name (paid), then you don't need this.

    From the post after the one I'm replying too, you seem to still be associating BIND with being a web server. It's NOT. BIND, connecting on port 53, is on the correct port.

    Break down of some ports you may need for setting up your own servers:
    BIND - 53
    IMAP - 143
    HTTP - 80
    POP - 110
    SMTP - 25
    HTTPS - 443

    Don't sway from the defaults unless you need to. As a beginner with such things, I don't see you having a need to change.
    "I don't need to get a life. I'm a gamer. I have lots of lives!"
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    Thanks

    What I'm trying to do is set up a server for my site (that I'm going to register soon ). I've had my site before and had it hosted with other companies.

    There was always a problem with something with them. Now I can control all the settings. In a way. hehehe

    Here's my DNS log when I turn BIND on:

    Code:
    17-Jun-2012 21:57:30.022 general: info: managed-keys-zone/host: loaded serial 0
    17-Jun-2012 21:57:30.024 general: info: zone 0.0.127.in-addr.arpa/IN/host: loaded serial 2012061701
    17-Jun-2012 21:57:30.024 general: info: zone mysite.com/IN/host: loaded serial 2004041700
    17-Jun-2012 21:57:30.030 general: notice: all zones loaded
    17-Jun-2012 21:57:30.030 general: notice: running
    17-Jun-2012 21:57:30.031 notify: info: zone mysite.com/IN/host: sending notifies (serial 2004041700)
    17-Jun-2012 21:57:30.031 notify: info: zone 0.0.127.in-addr.arpa/IN/host: sending notifies (serial 2012061701)
    Looks good huh?

    An IP can be fine, however, if it's a dynamic IP, you would need to know your IP to be able to connect to the web server, unless you set up a dynamic DNS name, such as with dyndns.org. If it's static, then again, you will need to know your IP, and memorize it.
    Here's my IP if you want to see if you can see anything: 192.168.254.1 That's my static IP on my side the router. When I go to this IP I see my Wamp Server Configuration page.

    I'm not sure what information I can put out here.

    You don't need to buy a domain to host a webserver. You can use free dns services, again, such as dyndns.org. (There are numerous others, but this is just one I use on occasion). For just an IP, and a free domain name, you don't even need to set up BIND. You can have a webserver without BIND. BIND is used to associate a domain name to an IP. If you don't have a domain name (paid), then you don't need this.
    Yeah, I wanted my own so I can "associate a domain name to an IP" I want to have all my mail white-listed so it goes into peoples inbox and not their spam-box.

    The domain I want is my old domain and it has expired and needs transferred. So it will cost a few bucks.

    These ports you mention, how can make sure they are open? Just open them in Windows Firewall? Like BIND is running with no errors so that means it's connected? Plus I have to open the ports on the router too?
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    Originally Posted by Lovepepper
    Here's my IP if you want to see if you can see anything: 192.168.254.1 That's my static IP on my side the router. When I go to this IP I see my Wamp Server Configuration page.
    This is your internal IP. So only you, and others within your network, would be able to see your webpage with that IP. For people outside your network to see, you would need to give your external IP address. The external IP is the one provided by your ISP. If you are a residential user, chances are it's a dynamic IP, although there are some ISP's that can provide residential users a static IP for some extra money.

    I'm not sure what information I can put out here.
    You can put whatever info you want out here. Some don't like displaying their IP and/or domain name info though, which is why if you would like, you can just PM me whatever info you want. (Also, I wouldn't recommend putting personal info on the forums either)

    These ports you mention, how can make sure they are open? Just open them in Windows Firewall? Like BIND is running with no errors so that means it's connected? Plus I have to open the ports on the router too?
    If you have a firewall, then you will need to open the appropriate ports.
    Through the router, you would need to forward the appropriate ports to the local IP of the server (IP address you listed above)
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    If you don't have to, I'd recommend not setting up your own DNS server. If all you want to do is host a site yourself, you can probably get free dns from your registrar. I use godaddy's DNS servers for my public internet domains. It's much easier and more reliable than running your own DNS.
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    I agree with Doug G; don't operate your own DNS unless you have to. Registering a DNS server is not as simple as registering a domain name, and involves other headaches such as finding a secondary server.

    J.A. Coutts
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    Originally Posted by couttsj
    I agree with Doug G; don't operate your own DNS unless you have to. Registering a DNS server is not as simple as registering a domain name, and involves other headaches such as finding a secondary server.

    J.A. Coutts
    I remember running into so many problems when I set up my first DNS server, but I'm glad I did as I have learned so much. My DNS server was just for me, and all of my domains. I had no problem with the server cutting out when the internet did, or whatnot.

    So I agree to an extent with you and Doug... Only operate your DNS server if you have to, or if you want to learn. Don't operate your own DNS if you are only doing it because you think you have to in order to run your own site off your computer.
    "I don't need to get a life. I'm a gamer. I have lots of lives!"

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