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    Can not find hostname on DNS Manager but device will still ping based on hostname


    I can not find hostname WC2FDDP1 on the DNS Manager. But when the device is online, pc tech can ping the hostname just fine.

    Even when WC2FDDP1 is offline and I try to ping it, I get the following:

    Pinging wc2fddp1 [10.150.228.14] with 32 bytes of data:

    Request timed out.
    Request timed out.
    Request timed out.
    Request timed out.


    Any clue how is this even possible???



    Thanks in advance!
    -Rez
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    hosts file?
    The moon on the one hand, the dawn on the other:
    The moon is my sister, the dawn is my brother.
    The moon on my left and the dawn on my right.
    My brother, good morning: my sister, good night.
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    Hi there - I am a Cisco Engineer trying to get this issue resolved. Could you please explain what did you mean by hosts file?

    I appreciate you taking time in responding to my email!!

    -Rez
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    Bearing in mind I have not the faintest clue of the environment which you have (hardware/software) I took a stab at a suggestion of how a hostname is being resolved without it being in DNS. In most systems that means a hosts file. In *nix syste, that'll be a file called /etc/hosts or /etc/inet/hosts. In Windows systems it'll be in the \windows\system32\drivers\etc and be either hosts or lmhosts.sam. All they are is a plain text file that can be read by the IP stack (depending on configuration) containing names and IP addresses, thus permitting name resolution.

    If the host is offline (powered down, etc.,) it will, naturally, not respond to pings, but if you have the name/IP pair in a hosts file then the name will be resolved and you would then see what you do when you do a ping.
    The moon on the one hand, the dawn on the other:
    The moon is my sister, the dawn is my brother.
    The moon on my left and the dawn on my right.
    My brother, good morning: my sister, good night.
    -- Hilaire Belloc
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    In most network systems, communication is via MAC address. To communicate by IP address, the IP address must be converted to a MAC address, and this is done through ARP packets and the ARP table. Also present is some kind of network browser. Traditionally this has been done through NETBIOS, but several years ago Microsoft introduced Link Layer Topology to replace it. The network browser maintains a map of the currently connected devices by machine name. A DNS name can be entirely different from a machine name.

    J.A. Coutts

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