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    What is the proper way to tell a developer that this is not okay. Especially when it's my code.

    html4strict Code:
    <ul id="dateselect-all" class="timechange-menu">
      <li>
        &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#" style="color: #fff;">Date Range</a>
        <?php include("timeMenu.html"); ?>
      </li>
    </ul>


    I am talking about 9 non-breaking spaces instead of a style rule.
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    He makes me want to cry:

    html4strict Code:
    <input type="radio" class="time-rad rad-named" value="named-time" checked />Named Time Period <br />
    <!-- ... -->
    <input type="radio" class="time-rad rad-relative" value="relative-time" />Relative Time Period <br />
    <!-- ... -->
    <input type="radio" class="time-rad rad-absolute" value="absolute-time" />Absolute Time Period


    These are supposed to be grouped Radio Buttons. I want to ask him if he learned web development from the back of a Cracker Jack box, or w3schools?
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    Hi,

    well, that's the problem of learning things on your own: If you don't learn from good sources or don't keep up to date, you'll end up doing garbage.

    Interestingly, this seems to be massive problem in web development. I mean, I'd expect people dealing with fancy web sites everyday to keep up to new techniques and best practices. But that's hardly the case. Many "developers" are stuck somewhere in the 90s and never gave up the table layouts, the non-breaking spaces etc. Because that's what they learned as a kid or young adult, and why bother learning something new?

    How to tell this somebody in a polite way? I don't know. I think this is an issue of attitude rather than a lack of technical knowledge. I mean, the idea of semantic HTML isn't exactly new. If you still don't know it, it means you haven't cared about HTML for a long, long time.

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    Being hired as a Web Developer with a BsCS degree would make me think that current practices and technologies would be used.

    I learned on my own and all I had was bad sources, then people telling me my sources weren't considered good and which ones were. IE w3schools was my go to source 10 years ago. Now I use w3.org specs or MDN or similar.

    I think I will tell him by leaving it as it is until it becomes a problem - and it will become a problem very soon - then ask him to fix it.

    Kind of a fight fire with fire approach but I'm not going to go around fixing his code.
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    Originally Posted by WrinkledCheese
    What is the proper way to tell a developer that this is not okay. ...
    By going to him and saying, "When you have situation X, please use solution Y rather than Z, because <insert cogent argument>."

    Why are you afraid to just state the problem? Seems like a simple, straightforward teaching moment to me.

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    If you have hired a web developer then one would think you would get at the very least semantic html.

    If you're in charge of this person you need to tell him his code is no good and explain the reasons why.

    If I was paying their wages I would expect a proper job.

    Failing that, hire a new developer with proven record and sample code.

    Kind regards,

    NM.
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    Did no one check this employee's background before hiring him? What was his degree field?

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    A lot of &nbsp; is probably redundant?

    Aside from what degree he is having, maybe he just can't enjoy the beauty of an efficient coding. Or possibly a lack of good appreciation?

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    Look at it from this viewpoint:

    If you went into McDonalds and ordered a cheeseburger and got chicken nuggets, would you complain or sit there and eat it while probably frustrated the crap out of? Same concept the only difference is that you are in charge of this person so it's even more appropriate to speak to them.

    I think you know what you need to do

    Regards,

    NM.
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    Originally Posted by Jacques1
    Hi,

    Interestingly, this seems to be massive problem in web development. I mean, I'd expect people dealing with fancy web sites everyday to keep up to new techniques and best practices. But that's hardly the case. Many "developers" are stuck somewhere in the 90s and never gave up the table layouts, the non-breaking spaces etc. Because that's what they learned as a kid or young adult, and why bother learning something new?
    A lot of people seem to have this 'if it isn't broken, why fix it' attitude when it comes to learning new things, especially if it is something a bit more complex like coding. Why worry about the code if the website LOOKS the way you want it to look? Isn't that also what programs like DreamWeaver used to teach people?

    Originally Posted by EEsterling
    Why are you afraid to just state the problem? Seems like a simple, straightforward teaching moment to me.
    There is nothing to it to just say something you don't like and want a web developer to change. It's the only way the developer will know what you want done with the website. If I were in his shoes, I'd want the input and criticism.

    Originally Posted by Winters
    Did no one check this employee's background before hiring him? What was his degree field?
    It's also good to see links of what work they've done in the past, kind of like you would with a handyman doing major rebuilding. You wouldn't set them loose unless they've proven their ability to you before they even start.
    Last edited by LDHosting; June 1st, 2013 at 05:44 AM.
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