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    Question How to run/test JavaScript?


    Hello,

    I'm reading David Flanagan's "JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, 6th ed".

    It only actually tells users how to run JS code on page 311, where users are told of the following solutions:

    "Client-side JavaScript code is embedded within HTML documents in four ways:

    • Inline, between a pair of <script> and </script> tags
    • From an external file specified by the src attribute of a <script> tag
    • In an HTML event handler attribute, such as onclick or onmouseover
    • In a URL that uses the special javascript: protocol
    ."

    I was wondering what professional JS developers use to write and test their code: Do they use a good text editor with syntax high-lighting + autocompletion, hit F5 in the browser to reload the page every time they make a change, and use some add-on in the browser to investigate errors? Or are there full-fledged IDE's similar to MS VisualStudio for non-web languages?

    Thank you.
    --------
    <strike>Edit: For instance, I wrote this piece of code, which doesn't work (nothing displayed on screen when calling index.html), but Firefox doesn't display any error. How would I go trying to understand why it's not working?</strike>

    Firebug showed that a .js file shouldn't contain <script>...</script> lines.
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    Are you using an external script file?

    If you are using an external stylesheet, you don't need to add the <script> tags.

    I use WAMP since I started PHP so I use it all the time to test anything really. I use Firefox and Firebug and like you said, especailly javascript I always do a hard refresh (F5) after changing anything to make sure it's still working.

    Also, try putting a console.log() statement with variables to check their value.

    Hope this helps,

    Regards

    NM.
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    Thanks for the input.

    So the standard tools used by JS developers:
    - Firefox and the Firebug add-on
    - a good text editor with syntax highlighting, and ideally code autocompletion
    - hit F5 to test every time a change is made to the JS source code
    - console.log() statement with variables to check their value.

    Could someone recommend a good text editor for Windows that supports JS code autocompletion?
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    Number 1: is a 100% must in my opinion and I think in most developers opinions.

    Number 2: I agree with using an editor with syntax highlighting but I don't think autocompletion is a necessity. Each to their own but that kind of thing annoys me.

    Number 3: This is what I do and it's mainly because i'm relatively new to javascript. I skimmed the surface off it a couple of years ago but never got into any real depth. I've taken it up again in the last month or so.

    Number 4: I only console.log() something if I get an unexpected result, for instance I might get an error in firebug, or sometimes the console.log() might not work inside a function so I know if it's a passed parameter then the issue could potentially be there so it even gives you an idea of where the error could lie. I think it will log most errors for you.

    hope this helps.

    Kind regards,

    NM.

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