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    Install Slackware to an external hard drive


    I recently had a laptop die on me. I, of course, then to recover the hard drive.

    I wanted to install slackware to a partition on my drive, so I can have a linux distro with me( also I have a FAT32 partition for shared space)

    I have a Slackware 13.1 disk one (which i need, since I don't need a graphical environment or anything), and proceedd to follow setup program.

    I have a 5GB '/' partition, a 10GB '/home' partition, and a 2GB swap partition. My ROOT partition is bootable.

    The setup program seemed to complete succesfully, but it won't boot. When I choose to boot from my hard drive (in the bios), it reverts to the slackware disk, if present, or the standard windows drive.

    I installed LILO to the superblock of my external, because according to the setup the MBR option installs to "The MBR of your first hard drive", and I wasn't sure if that was right, since my first hard drive is my windows one.

    Since i'm not even seeing LILO, I think it has to do with installing to the superblock.

    I want to be able to boot a basic linux distro if needed from whatever computer I want. I'm not sure if slackware was the right choice, but it was one that I had worked with installing before, and knewthat you didn't necasarraly have to instal all the graphics stuff. I just want a shell. lol

    Sorry if my question sounds retarted, I'm new to the whole "Multiple drives, and operating systems" thing
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    Update


    I ended up finding a very useful thing.

    It's called Slax. It took about five seconds to set up after I found it.

    Slax Website

    You can either download a live cd iso, or a tar ball. If you use the tar ball, you can just extract it to a flash drive, and go to /boot and run "bootinst.sh" or (in windows) "bootinst.bat". That will make the drive bootable (it also overwrites the MBR of whatever device that partition is on, so be careful if you are doing it on a hard drive).

    You can then boot into the drive. It comes with X, and KDE installed, and setup. You can choose to boot straight into KDE (as root), run a fresh version (more details on disk), or be taken to a prompt. Among some other hardware related options.

    It is great.


    (NOTE)
    For anyone (like me) who doesn't like KDE4's new GUI, I think this is using KDE 3.Something, because it doesn't look the same.
    Last edited by Caleb1994; October 22nd, 2010 at 03:37 PM.
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    slakware is a better option i suppose. you should have choose mbr as it asked
    "The MBR of your first hard drive"

    lilo will figure to give you option which to boot. i'v slax lately and it seems little wierd that you have to install modules manually since it don't provide dependency checking, i guess.
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    Originally Posted by trentz
    slakware is a better option i suppose. you should have choose mbr as it asked
    "The MBR of your first hard drive"

    lilo will figure to give you option which to boot. i'v slax lately and it seems little wierd that you have to install modules manually since it don't provide dependency checking, i guess.
    As far as the MBR, I didn't want it to be dependant on a boot loader. I wanted to be able to boot the drive directly from any computer. Essentially making it a Live USB distro, which is what slax is for. lol

    Slax is kind of weird, I'll give you that. If you don't shut down correctly, it kinda freaks out, because of the way it saves stuff, but that's alright. That's what the 'Slax always fresh' option is for. lol I'm not sure about modules. When installing things, I have just grabbed the source and used:

    $ ./configure
    $ make
    $ make install

    and if there is no install option for make, I just copy the executable to /bin, for things like shell utilities. For things like games, and full applications with media and stuff, I would just copy everything to a folder, and run it from there. ./configure should find any dependency issues.

    If I find something better for Live USB drives I will let you all know. At this point, slax is the easiest I've found to install, and get up and running.

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