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    Newbie help needed in triple boot


    Hi guys,
    I am a true newbie to Linux. After all seeing so much discussion on Linux, talking about its stablity and many of its FREE bundled server software, I decided to give it a shot.

    BUT I have a small problem here. Currently, I have 4 partitions in my 2 HD and the following is installed on each paritition:

    C: (4.87GB) - Win98SE
    D: (3.59GB) - My data drive, contains all the mp3 and installers all that stuffs
    E: (6.31GB) - Win2K Pro
    F: (876MB) - Just a backup parition

    With this, I thought I would sacrifice my F: for the Linux OS and do a TRIPLE BOOT, thus need advice from you guys:

    1) Is the 876MB enough?

    2) Which distribution is good for novice like me?

    3) I have heard of LILO Boot, how does it works?

    4) How can I install linux on F: so that my data on other drives would not be overwritten?(I dont wish my system to be hay-wire after my installation.)

    I would like to thank you guys for taking the time to read my thread and really appreciate if you could provide me some advice/suggestions on my aboved qns.
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    I'd suggest that a newbie installing linux would need 2-3 GB
    just so you could experiment and trim it as you gain understanding

    Get partition magic or something equivalent to save much headache

    I would suggest slackware as it's straight forward

    but for me when I upgrade it will be to FreeBSD as the stats show it has the best up times


    others will suggest redhat for a newbie, but it's hard as hell just like windows handcuffs a person in too many ways
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    I would also suggest about 2GB. You can get away with 800MB but if you're a newbie it's probably best if you start with a full newbie install which will probably want more disk space.

    You will also need two partitions, not just one:
    1 Ext2FS partition (linux partition)
    1 Swap partition (like a temp folder)

    I'd get partition magic, or something similar, to sort your partitions out first. Assuming you've done this, and you have:
    1.8GB Ext2FS
    0.2GB swap
    Then you won't harm your other partitions in the slightest by installing GNU/Linux.

    Now I'd suggest you go for Mandrake or RedHat, because they are made for those familiar with Windows to make the transition easier. Get either one and experiment with them until you're comfortable with them, then get eithre Slackware or Debian and install each one several times until you've got your preferred install. I say this because newbie distributions tend to be easy, but they aren't very good and they tend to confuse users about Linux. Slackware and Debian, on the other hand, are much much better and use a much cleaner layout, making you much more familiar with the workings of the OS once you've broached the subject with a newbie distro.

    LILO... well, when your computer boots up it checks something called the MBR (master boot record), which is seperate to the Hard Drive, and tells the computer what OS to boot into. When you install Windows, the installer writes "boot windows" to the MBR (not in those words of course!). When you install GNU/Linux, it usually asks you to install LILO, which will write "boot windows or gnu/linux or other os'" to the MBR. Once in linux you can change what LILO will write, and then rewrite to the MBR as many times as you like, allowing you to customise a boot menu which will give the option of which OS to boot into.

    If you want a handy introduction to using GNU/Linux (including some computing concepts you might want to be familiar with), check out:
    http://www.tomchance.uklinux.net/thh/3-gnu-linux/3.html
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    With partition magic or system commander, your existing partitions are resizable, so you can allocate more space for Linux.
    For the size allocation, I'd say give Linux at least 3GB to begin with for a newbie like you.
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    hi.Good to be here.


    I am hunter bowker.came here through google.this forum seems to be ranking high on google.btw what is the most busiest hour on this forum so that i could interact with peak members or is it always this lonely.

    Comments on this post

    • requinix disagrees : your mom is lonely
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    Though you can definitely get away with smaller, I usually shoot for about 8GB minimum for a play install. That will give you lots of breathing room and space to try out whatever you could want to install.

    Seriously, if you are a linux noob, do yourself a favor and just download Ubuntu and use that http://ubuntu.com. It's free, it's easier to use (as a desktop) than any of the others and it's widely used so finding answers to issues is usually just a quick google search away.
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    I use Fedora. A full new installation takes up about 5gb or thereabouts. A normal installation for me is usually around 2gb if I recall correctly.

    I find Fedora easier than Ubuntu, maybe because I've been using mostly Redhat since 1999 or so

    [edit]Oh, and what I was really going to say was I'd try to use a different machine or use virtualization instead of multibooting a single computer.[/edit]
    ======
    Doug G
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