Thread: ntfs in linux

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    ntfs in linux


    do i have append a modul or do i need to compile the kernel for having ntfs in linux?
    i m a rookie in linux, how can i append or compile a kernel?

    thanx in advance
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    99.9% you donīt need to compile a new kernel. if you did read that, this info is outdated.
    todayīs kernels are high-modularized ones.
    so you can do "modprobe ntfs" to load the necessary driver.

    but beware. donīt write to ntfs volumes. since MS does not publish how it works exactly, the linux ntfs driver is very beta.
    but for read-only access, it can do no harm!

    as newbie you should not compile kernels at all since you will probably **** up the whole system.
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    Originally posted by M.Hirsch
    as newbie you should not compile kernels at all since you will probably **** up the whole system.
    disagreed... Newbies should go ahead compile the kernel, when they make the mistake then they will learn more quickly than being afraid. When you want to get your system more stable and quickly then newbies will have to learn kernel, so they can modify and compile their own kernel right after they install Linux or BSD.
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    depends on your preferred way of learning.

    yes, i learnt a lot in the old times playing with fdisk in DOS

    but i disagree on the "more stable". if you compile your own kernel, you will have to include "beta" drivers or you lack a lot of functionality. but can you tell which ones will work for you and which ones not?
    you will have to read a lot of documentation and newsgroups then.

    If you want to get into the whole thing, you need c knowledge anyway, and this is not for beginners anymore... but i can still recommend this way to anyone doing regular backups...



    ps. sorry about the four-letter thing.. did vBulletin strip that by itself?
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    type at console:
    cat /proc/filesystems

    if ntfs is listed there than you can just mount away if it isn't then you need to modprobe your kernel.
    Have a lot of fun...
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    >> disagreed... Newbies should go ahead compile the kernel

    Don't forget, they are Linux newbies, not BSD newbies. The learning attitudes are so different. For instance, Linux newbies like to ask question whenever possible, and they don't RTFM. BTW, 90% of Linux users have never compiled a custom kernel whereas maybe 10% for BSD users, you see the differential here?

    >> but i disagree on the "more stable". if you compile your own kernel

    You probably happen to be part of that 90%. When you are talking about enabling feature that's not built into the kernel, yes, you can modprobe in Linux and BSD also can kldload just to enable particular feature. What if you want to disable something you don't use? Now that we are talking about optimization here. Configure a custom kernel makes your box run faster, more stable, more reliable, more efficiently and perhaps more securely. Why in the world does Linus Torvalds bother to continue in developing the kernel? Because Linux kernel needs improvement, bugs fix, additional features and many others, just to make it better and better.

    >> If you want to get into the whole thing, you need c knowledge anyway

    You must have misread something. Who told you that you need C knowledge to RTFM on how to compile a custom kernel? Note, I am talking about building a custom kernel, not kernel hacking.
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    Yes freebsd, I see your point about in the first explain of my disagree. You are right that Linux newbie and not BSD newbie are different.. Also, thank for explain and cover about kernel because I was going to post. You could explain better than I do.

    Anyway, freebsd is right about I am talking about do the build a custom kernel compile kernel to get the stuffs enable/disable to make the box run faster, more stable and more reliable instead kernel hacking..

    Thanks freebsd,
    Mezz
    Last edited by mezz; February 20th, 2002 at 12:01 AM.
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    You probably happen to be part of that 90%.
    nope, i did modifications to the kernel and several userspace programs as well...

    but i still donīt recommend this to anyone not having at least some basic knowledge of programming. not necessaritly c, but you really need hardware and system architecture knowledge. newbies wonīt even understand the words used in kernel configuration.

    but you are probably right about the newbies concerning linux bein 90% morons. they buy a pc-magazine with a cd-rom, install it and then start asking dumb questions instead of reading the docs.
    Configure a custom kernel makes your box run faster, more stable, more reliable, more efficiently and perhaps more securely.
    only if you know what you are doing though.
    there is many features that sound very nice from their name...

    can you tell when a driver is "experimental", if it will not **** up your system (like writing to ntfs like the thread started)? did you notice that ALL drivers for recent hardware are?
    (i only know linux, no *bsd)

    (probably you can. i can. but few others here. and buddah can not.)

    [edit]
    sorry, i did it again
    [/edit]

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