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    Unhappy How to by pass admin right


    I need help in configuring my vpn.
    I have installed my vpn but cannot configure using GUI mode.
    I have admin rights at back end..means i can configure if commands are given.
    any one pls help me providing with the commands to configure VPN
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    When I have some gui program that needs to run as root I usually just open a terminal, su to root then start the program using the command line.
    ======
    Doug G
    ======
    Bartender to Rene Descartes "have another beer?" Descartes: "I think not" and he vanished.
    --Alfred Bester
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    re


    installation is working fine with me..but i cannot make changes to configuration files.
    It needs to be done in GUI mode i guess..but again admin rights are required.




    Originally Posted by Doug G
    When I have some gui program that needs to run as root I usually just open a terminal, su to root then start the program using the command line.
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    general procedure that often works for this sort of problem


    list all your processes, I have an alias
    alias PS='COLUMNS=999 ps xauwwf'
    run the gui program in background presumably by clicking a button
    list your processes again
    find the command used to run the gui program as new process by comparing the two process lists (it will probably be near the bottom of the new list)
    then
    $ sudo command

    or you might be able to find the command directly from the properties of the icon.

    Oh---the changes probably don't need to be made in gui mode. You simply don't know which files to change or how to modify them with a text editor. Neither do I.
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    Re


    this one is realy confusing for me..can u please explain in detail?


    Originally Posted by b49P23TIvg
    list all your processes, I have an alias
    alias PS='COLUMNS=999 ps xauwwf'
    run the gui program in background presumably by clicking a button
    list your processes again
    find the command used to run the gui program as new process by comparing the two process lists (it will probably be near the bottom of the new list)
    then
    $ sudo command

    or you might be able to find the command directly from the properties of the icon.

    Oh---the changes probably don't need to be made in gui mode. You simply don't know which files to change or how to modify them with a text editor. Neither do I.
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    detailed explanation.


    OK. It sounds like you start this gui program by clicking an icon, or perhaps through a menu item driven by a mouse.

    When you do this, you are not the superuser. So you can't make changes.

    Associated with this gui program is a command. You need to find the command so that you can run it from a terminal with
    sudo the_command

    Now, if the gui interface flashes on and immediately closes it might be hard to find. You'll have to find the command by investigating the icon or menu system. That might take some work.

    Another way to find the command, if the gui stays visible, is to

    1) start a terminal session. xterm perhaps.

    2) Execute the command ps xau making sure there is a way to view the output later.
    ps xau >& /tmp/1st_ps_command
    or use the scroll bar.

    3) start the vpn gui with your mouse.

    4) go back to your terminal window. Use ps xau again.

    5) Look for differences between the outputs from ps

    6) Among the differences you can probably find the command invoked by your mouse.

    7) Now that you know the command, you can shut down the useless vpn gui window.

    8) go back to your xterm window. Enter the command, but stick sudo in front of it. (you'll need to enter the root password) Now your VPN GUI is running as root enabling you to make changes.

    Or I could be completely wrong. I'm not sitting at your console.

    I like to look at the processes in tree form, and I like to see the entire command. Instead of using ps xau (and, by the way, the arguments to ps vary substantially between flavors of unix) I have the alias from earlier post. Then I only have to type the command PS to get the information I usually like to see.
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    Re


    i shall try this and get back to you..
    thanks for providing the steps..
    have a great time ahead..

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