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    linux install - multiple OS - 2 questions


    I've decided I want to add Red Hat Linux to my PC currently running Win2000. I have two questions:

    1.) For Linux, do I create a primary or extended partition?

    2.) I don't want to mess with a Linux boot disk. Should I use LILO or GRUB? Which partition or boot record do I install one of those to?

    Thanks!
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    Hi,

    Depending on what version of Redhat you are putting on, I think it can do the partitioning for you during the install? (I know suse7/8 does?). The other easy option is Partition Magic which will create the partition and format it to ext2.

    If you create an extended partition on your hd (Backup * first!) then run the RH install, it will ask you about where you want to install RH. Just select the extended partition you have created.

    LILO has always been ok for me when doing this, but i haven't used any other boot managers (There are a load out there!) so I cannot say what is better/worse? The RH installation will add LILO to your system during setup, so it is fairly easy to manage. You will need to put it in the MBR so it can load win as well.

    If you are unsure of anything though, have a good read of the docs, as it will probably keep you out of trouble.

    Regards, Ed.
    /* measure twice, cut once */
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    Thanks for the advice. I ended up using partition magic to create a blank 10 primary partition. Then I used the auto-partition feature in the Red Hat installer. It all worked.

    As far as the booting goes, I was scared to write something to the master boot record, so I decided not to install a boot loader, and just use a floopy disk. However, it's slow to boot that way and it will get annoying keeping up with the disk. If I write LILO or GRUB to the MBR, won't it destroy the way Windows 2000 boots? How can I do it?
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    Ooh. It would've been easier to just let redhat write to the MBR during the install, it's never bungled a dual boot installation of mine, and I've done dozens.

    Basically, what you've got to do is edit "/etc/lilo.conf" and set the proper parameters dependent on your hard drive geometry and partition layout.

    After you've got lilo.conf in shape, you run "/sbin/lilo" and it applies the changes to the master boot record you define with the "boot" parameter.

    This isn't that easy for linux newbies. . . Do a search for "lilo how-to"

    Here's a short tutorial.

    Here's a sample lilo.conf from my working dual-boot Sony VAIO SRX-77C laptop. . .

    Code:
    prompt
    timeout=50
    default=linux
    boot=/dev/hda
    map=/boot/map
    install=/boot/boot.b
    message=/boot/message
    lba32
    
    image=/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.18-3
    	label=linux
    	initrd=/boot/initrd-2.4.18-3.img
    	read-only
    	root=/dev/hda6
    
    other=/dev/hda1
    	optional
    	label=DOS
    Last edited by Hero Zzyzzx; June 11th, 2002 at 03:01 PM.
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    1) Logical partitions reside within an extended partition... Linux doesn't care if you install on a primary or logical partition so it doesn't really matter what you do.

    The issue here should be how many partitions you want for windows. I believe you can only use primary partitions for windows so that gives you a maximum of three (and linux on the last).

    Here's a scenario:

    Part. 1 - Primary (ntfs, system)
    Part. 2 - Primary (ntfs, school stuff)
    Part. 3 - Primary (ntfs, cooking tips library)

    Part. 4 - Extended (no filesystem)
    - Part. 5 - Logical ( ext2, / )
    - Part. 6 - Logical ( ext2, /home )
    - Part. 7 - Logical ( ext2, /var )
    Last edited by Redlum; June 14th, 2002 at 06:22 AM.
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    my experience


    I'm sort of in a hurry and I haven't read all the replies, so sorry if I repeat something....

    anyway, I installed redhad 7.2 on a win2000 machine. I partitioned first with PartitionMagic - created an extended partition, with an ex2 and swap.

    Lilo did cause some grief, but I think that's because my new os was beyond cyliner 1024. The end result was something like:

    Kernel panic: unable to mount root filesystem on Hda5.

    The end solution to this is to make sure LILO passes kernel parameters at boot time, to say where the root partition is: use the append directive to do this, eg
    append="root= /dev/hda5" in your lilo.conf

    I suggest you look it up, though, cos I'm rattling off the top of my head...

    back to work now!
    Christo
    This is me: http://chris.uk.com
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    Why doesn't anyone use grub? It is easy enough and installed flawlessly on each install that I have done.
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    Can you tell me how to configure GRUB?
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    If you are doing this from the RH install, it will configure it for you automatically, the same as lilo. Otherwise the info page for grub has excellent info on how to do this. An example is:
    Code:
    default=0
    timeout=10
    splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash/splash.xpm.gz
    title Red Hat Linux (2.4.7-10)
        root (hd0,0)
        kernal /vmlinuz-2.4.7-10 ro root=/dev/sda7
        initrd /initrd-2.4.7-10.img
    When I get home, I will post the configuration that I currently run there, which is configured to run windows xp and RH 7.3
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    Here is the exact grub.conf file on my home box:
    Code:
    # grub.conf generated by anaconda
    #
    # Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
    # NOTICE:  You have a /boot partition.  This means that
    #          all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
    #          root (hd1,0)
    #          kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/hdb5
    #          initrd /initrd-version.img
    #boot=/dev/hda
    default=1
    timeout=10
    splashimage=(hd1,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
    title Red Hat Linux (2.4.18-4)
    	root (hd1,0)
    	kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.18-4 ro root=/dev/hdb5 hdd=ide-scsi
    	initrd /initrd-2.4.18-4.img
    title Windows XP
    	rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    	chainloader +1

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