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    Question CentOS 7.1 VPS won't respond


    Hello,

    After a successfull setup of CentOS 7 and upload of websites and configuration and upgrade to CentOS 7.1 my VPS when i hit restart wont respond to ssh conenct neither it laods any webistes.

    I just conencted to it via serial console but i dont know how to troubleshoot to identify whats wrong.

    Help me if you please on what should i check.
    What is now proved was once only imagined!
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    Someone please ?!
    What is now proved was once only imagined!
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    Nothing in any of the logs? Is the sshd daemon running? Can you telnet in?
    The moon on the one hand, the dawn on the other:
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    My brother, good morning: my sister, good night.
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    Originally Posted by SimonJM
    Nothing in any of the logs? Is the sshd daemon running? Can you telnet in?
    I dont know. i try to ssh VPS_IP but it deosnt respind what logs should i check for to view?
    What is now proved was once only imagined!
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    Grumpier old Moderator
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    Sounds to me like you've done something to the firewall and it's blocking all the ports you need to use.

    What are you able to do over the serial connection? Can you get to a command prompt?
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    Damn!

    Stuff have fixed the server, its good that evrrything is functional again but bad because i didnt had the chnage to try what you suggested.

    I'm in normal ssh currently do you want me to show you some of the logs there to - perhaps we can find out what they have done somehow....?!
    What is now proved was once only imagined!
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    As you had connected via serial console I was suggesting you use that connection to do the trouble-shooting!
    A simple ps -ef | grep sshd would show if the daemon was running (be careful not to mistake the process running the grep for the 'real' one).
    Logs ... well, the syslog would be somewhere to check: look for messages at around the times you tried to connect.

    As for what was changed ... there might be a 'restarted' or 're-reading configuation file' message in a log (I am being cagey about naming logs as different systems, daemons and program can log in different places) somewhere. That may not be so if the server was re-booted to activate any changes.

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    • Will-O-The-Wisp agrees
    The moon on the one hand, the dawn on the other:
    The moon is my sister, the dawn is my brother.
    The moon on my left and the dawn on my right.
    My brother, good morning: my sister, good night.
    -- Hilaire Belloc
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    Hello simon,

    i can only find /var/log/messages (i can upload it somewhere of you want so both to habe alook at it)

    Also stufff told me that there was some issue in the iptables for some reason it blocked my own server vps ip address. But why iptables would block the server ip itself?
    What is now proved was once only imagined!
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    The iptables would most likely be it, as Dougs suggested, looks to have been a firewall issue. I have never used iptables, but I would imagine it will block whatever you tell it to, up to and including 127.0.0.1

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    • Nik agrees
    • Will-O-The-Wisp agrees
    The moon on the one hand, the dawn on the other:
    The moon is my sister, the dawn is my brother.
    The moon on my left and the dawn on my right.
    My brother, good morning: my sister, good night.
    -- Hilaire Belloc
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    Haha!! It's just that i have never used iptables so far let alone configuring them! Is it possible for real to block by itself 127.0.0.1 ?

    Here is the output you have requested.

    Code:
    [root@nexus ~]# ps -ef | grep ssd
    root      4108  4086  0 07:13 pts/0    00:00:00 grep --color=auto ssd
    [root@nexus ~]#
    May i post /var/log /messages to pastebin?
    What is now proved was once only imagined!
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    It should be sshd (not ssd)
    I would not be sure what I was looking for, nor even if it was there as it may depend on logging level, in the log file, but go ahead, and if you could also note a time or two that you tried connecting and could not that would help.
    The moon on the one hand, the dawn on the other:
    The moon is my sister, the dawn is my brother.
    The moon on my left and the dawn on my right.
    My brother, good morning: my sister, good night.
    -- Hilaire Belloc
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    Code:
    [root@nexus ~]# ps -ef | grep sshd
    root       327     1  0 May08 ?        00:00:08 /usr/sbin/sshd -D
    root     26308   327  0 19:27 ?        00:00:00 sshd: root@pts/0
    root     26332 26310  0 19:27 pts/0    00:00:00 grep --color=auto sshd
    [root@nexus ~]#
    /var/log/messages is just too HUGE to be pasted even in pastebin!!
    What is now proved was once only imagined!
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    Grumpier old Moderator
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    Unless you changed things, the default firewall in centos7 is firewalld, not iptables. Use firewall-cmd

    And unless you installed rsyslog you won't have traditional log messages in /var/log, centos7 uses the systemd journal. Use journalctl to inspect the journal file.
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    Originally Posted by Nik
    Code:
    [root@nexus ~]# ps -ef | grep sshd
    root       327     1  0 May08 ?        00:00:08 /usr/sbin/sshd -D
    root     26308   327  0 19:27 ?        00:00:00 sshd: root@pts/0
    root     26332 26310  0 19:27 pts/0    00:00:00 grep --color=auto sshd
    [root@nexus ~]#
    /var/log/messages is just too HUGE to be pasted even in pastebin!!
    The ssh daemon is running, which is not really that much of a surprise.

    There may be ways, with parameters, to extract only pertinent data from the journal/log with the commands Doug has suggested. If not piping the whle output through one or more grep commands would be useful to cut down the data to just those areas/times of interest.
    The moon on the one hand, the dawn on the other:
    The moon is my sister, the dawn is my brother.
    The moon on my left and the dawn on my right.
    My brother, good morning: my sister, good night.
    -- Hilaire Belloc
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    Grumpier old Moderator
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    I usually install rsyslog so I can use the old familiar /var/log files. If you want to check the systemd journal directly, you can use something like
    journalctl _SYSTEMD_UNIT=httpd.service
    to view log messages pertaining to the web server.

    iptables service is disabled on my centos7 servers. To check what ports are allowed using systemd firewalld, use
    firewall-cmd --list-all
    ======
    Doug G
    ======
    I've never been able to appreciate the sublime arrogance of folks who feel they were put on earth just to save other folks from themselves .." - Donald Hamilton
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