Page 1 of 2 12 Last
  • Jump to page:
    #1
  1. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0

    Smile Partitioning In Ubuntu16.04 after installation


    i just installed Ubuntu 16.04 but during the installation
    i choose "use LVM with the new Ubuntu installation" from the installation type setup wizard
    wizard. After the installation i plugged live Ubuntu again and
    choose "Try Ubuntu" and used G Parted for partition but when i do that
    the disk ("lvm2 pv") have a "key" symbol in it and said to un-mount
    before resize.but i couldn't do that.so how can i unmount that and how can i partition my drive
    can someone help me with this issue.
  2. #2
  3. Forgotten Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    16,209
    Rep Power
    9644
    If you don't like the partitioning then reinstall Ubuntu. It's not like you have anything set up yet, and you're more likely to do damage if you mess with the partition tables when you don't know what you're doing.

    To answer the question, you must unmount it. Can't modify a disk in active use. If you can't unmount it then maybe root can, and if root can't then you need to find out why.
    Last edited by Doug G; July 13th, 2017 at 01:08 PM.
  4. #3
  5. No Profile Picture
    Grumpier old Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    14,544
    Rep Power
    4542
    Last time I looked gparted didn't support manipulating lvm partitions, you'd use lvm tools to create/delete volumes. If you're trying to re-install, perhaps simply delete the existing lvm partition prior to running the installer, but you'd have to back up anything on the existing system you want to preserve.

    My recommendation is learn and use LVM. Fedora forced it on me some years ago, and now I'd never use anything but lvm partitioning for a new os installation. LVM makes your life so much easier later on when you may need to resize or otherwise change your disk layout.

    Oh, you can't actually unmount a lvm pv. You have to remove it using lvm tools.
    Last edited by Doug G; July 13th, 2017 at 01:08 PM.
    ======
    Doug G
    ======
    I've never been able to appreciate the sublime arrogance of folks who feel they were put on earth just to save other folks from themselves .." - Donald Hamilton
  6. #4
  7. Forgotten Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    16,209
    Rep Power
    9644
    I totally didn't think about the LVM part.

    LVM is magical in that it works with virtual ("logical") volumes which aren't actually set up on the disk, which is why gparted can't do anything with them per se. Behind the scenes are the actual drives and partitions (the sorts of things gparted could work with). If you're a programmer, you could think of disks having compile-time partitions while LVM's volumes are more like run-time partitions.

    To quote Wikipedia,
    LVM can be considered as a thin software layer on top of the hard disks and partitions,
  8. #5
  9. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0
    Originally Posted by requinix
    If you don't like the partitioning then reinstall Ubuntu. It's not like you have anything set up yet, and you're more likely to do damage if you mess with the partition tables when you don't know what you're doing.

    To answer the question, you must unmount it. Can't modify a disk in active use. If you can't unmount it then maybe root can, and if root can't then you need to find out why.
    i have setup some applications like lambstack and so if its possible without re installation it would me much better.
  10. #6
  11. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0
    Originally Posted by requinix
    I totally didn't think about the LVM part.

    LVM is magical in that it works with virtual ("logical") volumes which aren't actually set up on the disk, which is why gparted can't do anything with them per se. Behind the scenes are the actual drives and partitions (the sorts of things gparted could work with). If you're a programmer, you could think of disks having compile-time partitions while LVM's volumes are more like run-time partitions.

    To quote Wikipedia,
    file:///home/floret/Pictures/lvm.png

    i used LVM app.and tried the partition but it didnt work .i may done some mistakes.
    http://thegeekdiary.com/wp-content/u...ation-tool.png
    (not the exact picture its from the internet)
    i chose logical view and i chose my drive
    https://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/D...lvm-main18.png
    from the 'edit properties' option ,
    L V Name :root
    Mirrored :unchecked
    LV size :100GB
    file system:ext4
    mount :unchecked

    mount when rebooted:unchecked
    pressed ok but nothing happened so what did i do wrong:
  12. #7
  13. Forgotten Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    16,209
    Rep Power
    9644
    You're trying to unmount the root partition? That's not going to go well for you.

    Why are you trying to change the partitioning? What is the problem that you think changing partitions will solve?
  14. #8
  15. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0
    currently my system have only one partition(287GB). i want to make one more partition from shrinking the current so it will be like 100GB for root and 187GB for other files
    when i used lvm and tried to do this pop up an error saying something like "the logical drive is not mounted but its in use so close all the applications first "
    what should i do?
  16. #9
  17. Forgotten Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    16,209
    Rep Power
    9644
    When you tried before and "nothing happened", were you trying from the LiveDVD? Did you reboot?
    When you tried now and got the error message, was that also from the LiveDVD? What did you do differently to get an error message this time?

    What should work is
    1. Boot from LiveDVD
    2. Make sure the volume is unmounted
    3. Use the command-line to resize, because apparently the GUI might be buggy.
    Code:
    lvreduce -r -L 100G /dev/whatevergroup/whatevername
  18. #10
  19. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0
    yeah i was using Ubuntu live using pendrive. and open gparted but that time the "Key "symbol showed. then i tried Logiacal Volume Management.
    the setting i used is above mentioned so i fed up and asked in this forum .after that to day i tried LVM from ubuntu(not live) so this error pop-up.
  20. #11
  21. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0
    Originally Posted by requinix
    When you tried before and "nothing happened", were you trying from the LiveDVD? Did you reboot?
    When you tried now and got the error message, was that also from the LiveDVD? What did you do differently to get an error message this time?

    What should work is
    1. Boot from LiveDVD
    2. Make sure the volume is unmounted
    3. Use the command-line to resize, because apparently the GUI might be buggy.
    Code:
     lvreduce -r -L 100G /dev/whatevergroup/whatevername
    1.how do i unmount it
    2.you mean like lvreduce -r -L 100G /dev/sda5 right.
    .i got this from listing only the logical volume
    Code:
    sudo lvmdiskscan -l
    is it how it will be
  22. #12
  23. Forgotten Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    16,209
    Rep Power
    9644
    1. By checking if it's mounted (see `mount`) and, if so, I think you can just `unmount` it.

    2. sda5 is the physical drive. You have to find the LVM volume and then the logical partition it's using as the root. Try `pvdisplay`.
  24. #13
  25. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0
    after 'pvdisplay' command is it shows list of commands in that
    pv name :/dev/sda5/
    uv name : ubuntu-uv
    size :
    etc so which one i use? pv name (/dev/sda5) only
    and where can i uncheck the mount and unmount option,during live cd process or after booting the live cd or in the Logical Volume Management
  26. #14
  27. Forgotten Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    16,209
    Rep Power
    9644
    Take about an hour, right now, to learn about what LVM is and what it does. Please. It will make this all so much easier for everyone. Because if you're using Linux then you need to learn how your system will work anyways.

    When you're done, tell me the name of the volume group and the path to the logical root volume.
  28. #15
  29. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    0
    this is also called learning right i'm trying to learn about it from experts
Page 1 of 2 12 Last
  • Jump to page:

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo