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  1. DNS/BIND Guru
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    Free email hosting?


    I have registered a domain and got it hosted. First I tried to host my own email server, but my comcast IP is of course blocked by most mail servers so I can't send mail very well. I could setup free forwarding of the email address to an existing email address of mine, but I still have problems sending mail with my domain's email address in the from field.

    So I need a POP3 and outgoing SMTP server and incoming MX SMTP servers someplace with which I can recieve and send mail for my domain.

    Can I get this for free someplace? It seems likely, there are several POP3 email services out there that gives ya a choice as to what mail domain you wanna use. Well, I'd like to use my own. That wouldn't take any more resources I think. I've done some searching already, but so far no luck. Any of ya know of any?
    Send me a private message if you would like me to setup your DNS for you for a price of your choosing. This is the preferred method if your DNS needs to be fixed/setup fast and you don't have the time to bounce messages back and forth on a forum. Also, check out these links:

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    After some more searching I realized I need to clarify something. I just want the free email hosting. I cannot transfer domain registration or hosting to another service to make use of the free email hosting. I can set the MX records myself.
    Send me a private message if you would like me to setup your DNS for you for a price of your choosing. This is the preferred method if your DNS needs to be fixed/setup fast and you don't have the time to bounce messages back and forth on a forum. Also, check out these links:

    Whois Direct | DNS Crawler | NS Trace | Compare Free DNS Hosts
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    You can use your ISP's SMTP server as a relay for your mailserver, thus avoid the IP blocking. You can even set it so that only certain domains use your ISP and the rest use your server. In Postfix you can do this by transport mapping.

    transport_maps = hash:/etc/postfix/transport
    for individual domains or
    relayhost = smtp.my.domain
    for all domains

    Most servers have similar features.
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    I don't even know if comcast has a smtp server with open relay for their clients.
    Send me a private message if you would like me to setup your DNS for you for a price of your choosing. This is the preferred method if your DNS needs to be fixed/setup fast and you don't have the time to bounce messages back and forth on a forum. Also, check out these links:

    Whois Direct | DNS Crawler | NS Trace | Compare Free DNS Hosts
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    If you have a email address with them, it likely they do. It's not considered an open relay, because your in their network. Check if you mail server has a smart smtp option, if so you use your account to send it.
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    Well, I don't have an email account with them, but with that in mind, I tested relaying an email through the comcast.net mx servers. They rejected the email and told me that comcast clients should use smtp.comcast.net. I then tested using that server, and it was accepted. Then I looked in the account I was supposed to recieve the mail and sure enough, it passed through raising no junk mail warnings. However, I put the server's IP into a blacklist checker, and found that a couple of DB's have that IP (or PTR) or partial blacklisted.

    I'm not sure yet if this is acceptable. I'll try it out for a while and see if I run into any problems. Thanks for the idea though!

    P.S. I'm still looking for a free email host.
    Send me a private message if you would like me to setup your DNS for you for a price of your choosing. This is the preferred method if your DNS needs to be fixed/setup fast and you don't have the time to bounce messages back and forth on a forum. Also, check out these links:

    Whois Direct | DNS Crawler | NS Trace | Compare Free DNS Hosts
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    I put the server's IP into a blacklist checker, and found that a couple of DB's have that IP (or PTR) or partial blacklisted
    That's normal. These days it's relatively difficult to find an IP as clean as mine. A particular IP might get blacklisted, definitely not the SMTP of your cable provider, as the blacklist maintainers are not that dumb.
    You can use your ISP's SMTP server as a relay for your mailserver
    That almost always work. If your ISP requires you to use SMTP-AUTH only, then that's not the case. Some ISPs offer SMTP-AUTH as an option for customers roaming purpose.

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