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    Put a mail server on my laptop for travel


    I travel a lot and need to be able to send out our stock options alerts to about 3400 while I'm traveling. I can't rely on my office ISP because of their limitations per day. I can't rely on the ISP I use while I'm traveling because of the inconsistencies of such different services.

    All I need is the ability to send all the emails on a given day over about a 30 minute time period. I can then shut down since all our emails return to our office ISP. This happens 1 to 3 times a week.

    I could sign up for a remote host email server, sign in and send my emails from them. I would rather not do this.

    I would rather have an email server on my laptop that I always carry so I can control everything.

    Is this possible?
    If so, what do I have to have?
    What software can I use?
    What problems might I face?

    Thanks in advance.
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    Having a mail server of your own won't make a difference in the amount of email you can send out. All email is regulated by the ISP or host you are using, most of which have a cap. When traveling, you will be connecting to open networks, and chances are, they will regulate how much you can use.

    You may want to look into setting up a mail server at home and set up some sort of remote access so that you can log in from your laptop to your home computer and send the emails that way. Your home ISP may also restrict the amount, but you may be able to get a business account with your ISP if it's feasible, and the limitations are usually higher.
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    I suggest you go ahead and use a service. You could put any number of smtp servers on your laptop, with the proper version of windows you may have the IIS SMTP server available to you. But many isp's will block port 25 so you won't be able to send out from that Holiday Inn, and even if you could use the connection you're on most likely a good majority of your mail would get bounced as spam because your mail server wouldn't have reverse dns, spf, etc.
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    Follow up question


    Thank you for your suggestions.

    I'm not sure of this so please correct me if I'm wrong.

    No matter what I say my computer is (domain, DNS, nameserver, etc.) my actual connection must be directly to the Internet or the specific gateway I'm going through will not match and trouble will occur.

    If so, then how does a company have its own host without having to run its own wire to some central station? My understanding is that even if I use the ISP from my office to access the Internet, I can still run my own website with direct access from and to the Internet. What am I missing?

    It's been suggested that I contact my ISP for a dedicated static DNS. Does that mean I would use their wire from my office to the Internet central processor and bypass their gateway somehow?

    If that's required then it means that each connection I tie into while traveling would have to grant me specific permission OR I would have to dial into my office setup and then remotely control it to have it send out my email. Is this correct?
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    A physical connection to the internet is given an IP address by the ISP that provides the connection.

    The owner of a domain name registers that domain name with an authorized IANA domain registrar.

    DNS identifies the IP address(s) associated with computers (hosts). You as the domain owner have arranged for your domain name to be in the DNS system by identifying the DNS servers that authoritatively provide information about your domain name.

    Since IP addresses are associated with fixed physical locations, you can't just move a host around without updating the DNS, and that is not instantaneous, it may take hours to days for an ip address change to be reflected throughout the internet.

    For email, one of the DNS entries you made was a MX record identifying the host that is responsible for receiving email for the domain. That is also associated with a fixed location.

    Sending mail isn't tied to your domain mail server, pretty much everything in outgoing mail can be faked/spoofed/lied about. Which is why we have spam. In the fight against spam, one test is that your outgoing mail server has a reverse DNS entry and many MTA's will bounce a message that doesn't have a proper reverse DNS, since having a reverse DNS pretty much identifies the fixed location where the mail originated.

    You can send mail from any internet connection but because of the above, if you send mail from your domain and your IP doesn't match the DNS for your domain, many recipients will throw the incoming message in the trash and never deliver it.

    Your easiest solution to get reliable mail delivery is to use your office mail server or a mailing service.
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    Thank you very much for this detailed explanation.

    I've heard many of the terms you used in buying and assigning my websites to various hosts, but never understood the physical aspect of what was being done. This makes it much clearer.

    I hope this thread is allowed to persist so other can learn from it.

    For me, I will consider this closed. Thank you.

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