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    Linksys Cisco E1200 V2 Slow Download Speed


    I have a Linksys Cisco E1200 V2 wireless N router. I've had it for a while and have had no issues until now. I'm on Comcast internet. If I connect directly to the Modem, it's lightning fast all the way around. However, when I run a speed test while on the wireless internet, my ping is anywhere from 9ms to 15ms, download speed around .5-1.5 mbps, and upload speed of 5-6mbps. So, only my download speed is messed up.

    I didn't change anything that would have sparked this. I have updated to the latest firmware version 2.0.05. I have tried going into the advanced settings to the Qos and disabling the WMM support, I've changed the channel about 6 times to different ones, I've tried lowering a setting (I'm sorry, but I forget what it's called, something about the maximum packets) down to 1300 based off a suggestion I found online, it's on WPA2/WPA Mixed security mode, but I've also tried the WPA2 Personal. I've tried the hard reset button on the bottom as well.

    I'm at a loss, I don't know how to fix it, and Cisco wants to charge me $30-$40 up front just to talk to me about it. Please help!
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    What kinda speeds do you you get if you connect "hardwired" to the router using an ethernet cable instead of using wireless?

    Also, when connected using wireless, at what speed is it "training" at? [you can find this out in the details window of your connection properties window]
    I'm wondering if you're actually connecting at N speed or if its even lower than G.
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    Originally Posted by DonR
    What kinda speeds do you you get if you connect "hardwired" to the router using an ethernet cable instead of using wireless?

    Also, when connected using wireless, at what speed is it "training" at? [you can find this out in the details window of your connection properties window]
    I'm wondering if you're actually connecting at N speed or if its even lower than G.
    When I'm hardwired, I'm running at around 27mbps download. I looked and I don't see anything about training speed. I see just "Speed" which is 54mbps. Howerver, when I'm wireless it's .5 to 1.5 if even that, and I'm 27 wired.
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    54mbps is wireless G which is theoretically 6.75MB/s maximum.
    Wireless G, actually runs at half-duplex which cuts that theoretical maximum down to 3.375MB/s..and figuring in the packet overhead, you can usually get about 2.5-2.7MB/s actual usable speed.
    If you figure in some other variables including signal strength and number of devices connected at same time to access wireless, 1.5MB/s may not be too far off from normal.

    If your devices are all wireless N compatible, I would suggest changing wireless settings in router to only use the N Band [not A, B, G, and N] and see if that helps any.
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    Originally Posted by DonR
    54mbps is wireless G which is theoretically 6.75MB/s maximum.
    Wireless G, actually runs at half-duplex which cuts that theoretical maximum down to 3.375MB/s..and figuring in the packet overhead, you can usually get about 2.5-2.7MB/s actual usable speed.
    If you figure in some other variables including signal strength and number of devices connected at same time to access wireless, 1.5MB/s may not be too far off from normal.

    If your devices are all wireless N compatible, I would suggest changing wireless settings in router to only use the N Band [not A, B, G, and N] and see if that helps any.

    -I tried this, and it crashed. I had to do a hard reset to get anything back.
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    What crashed? The Router or your device connecting to the router?
    If, the router crashed, how old is the router? Is it still under warranty? If so, send it back and get a replacement.
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    Originally Posted by DonR
    What crashed? The Router or your device connecting to the router?
    If, the router crashed, how old is the router? Is it still under warranty? If so, send it back and get a replacement.
    The software, it lost connectivity completely, and I couldn't get back onto the wireless without doing a hard reset. Perhaps "Crashed" was the wrong word. Router was purchased in November.
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    Were you conected to the router wirelessly while changing settings? If so, DON'T!!!
    Whenever changing settings , especially wireless related, while being connected wirelessly, will ALWAYS kill your connection and cause you headaches to reconnect.

    Are you certain that your device [laptop] has a wireless N adapter, and not a wireless G adapter?

    Changing that setting on your router to only use N, should have helped, but you would need to reset your laptop's wireless adapter to get it to reconnect [rebooting laptop would have worked].

    If everything had been working just fine and no changes had been introduced into your network [or in your house in the form of interference (microwave, new cordless telephone system, etc.)] , and it then started getting slow on wireless out of the blue, then, I would say replace the router.
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    Originally Posted by DonR
    Were you conected to the router wirelessly while changing settings? If so, DON'T!!!
    Whenever changing settings , especially wireless related, while being connected wirelessly, will ALWAYS kill your connection and cause you headaches to reconnect.

    Are you certain that your device [laptop] has a wireless N adapter, and not a wireless G adapter?

    Changing that setting on your router to only use N, should have helped, but you would need to reset your laptop's wireless adapter to get it to reconnect [rebooting laptop would have worked].

    If everything had been working just fine and no changes had been introduced into your network [or in your house in the form of interference (microwave, new cordless telephone system, etc.)] , and it then started getting slow on wireless out of the blue, then, I would say replace the router.

    Yea, I think I'm just going to Best Buy and buying a new router today. I have some reward points that should cover it.
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    You might also try loading a custom firmware onto the router such as dd-wrt and see if that changes anything [in case the linksys firmware IS actually faulty].

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