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    Static & Dynamic IPs - Netopia 3000


    Here's the deal. I'm not a network guy, I've just been tasked with getting the office network back to the way it was.

    The owner of a small company did not remember the password to our router, a Motorola Netopia 3000 DSL router. As such, we had to do a hard reset on the device. This in turn reset all of the information in the router and we've been working on getting it back "right" for the last couple of days now.

    It is currently "up" and they have internet access but where we're having the issue is, is having the router dole out DHCP IPs to any machine in the office.

    We have a stack of static IPs that I've used to configure the router but is there a way to configure this Netopia to use a static IP address, so I can access the router from outside the network, but give dynamic IP addresses on the "inside" of the network?

    Right now we have a stack of 8 static IPs which doesn't leave a lot left over if we have people come into the office and want to get on the internet.

    As alway, help is greatly appreciated.
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    I would search for the manual online and walk through the initial setup steps. What you're wanting to do is pretty basic and the manual should be able to walk you through this pretty easily. You'll basically assign a static public IP to the WAN port on the Netopia (using one of the 8 IPs you're given), and then enable DHCP the router; although this is often on by default.
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    Originally Posted by seack79
    I would search for the manual online and walk through the initial setup steps. What you're wanting to do is pretty basic and the manual should be able to walk you through this pretty easily. You'll basically assign a static public IP to the WAN port on the Netopia (using one of the 8 IPs you're given), and then enable DHCP the router; although this is often on by default.
    That's what we originally thought. However, the WAN configuration does not allow for me to input one of our static ip addresses. It just allows for me to select PPPoE and configure that interface, but no where is there a place to put in a static IP address.

    AT&T, the ISP, has instructed me to put the given LAN address (from them) in the LAN setting along with their subnet mask - which we do.

    When I attempt to configure the DHCP server portion, it won't allow me to put in 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.253. The router says it won't validate.

    This the pretty much the setup here we followed.

    I just don't get why I can't make this router server dynamic DHCP addresses inside our office whilst keeping one of the static IPs given by the provider.
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    There's two ways this can be done. One is to have basically a DMZ sort of network setup. This requires that your static devices be outside the router and have all the IP information on them individually. The important piece is that the gateway address is then the ISP's router (the same as whatever your Netopia gets via DHCP from the modem.)

    The other way, and the most likely, is to use a 1-to-1 NAT translation. Your internal devices will have a 192.168.x.x address (although you probably want to nail those statically, too) and the router's config says that anytime the 17.75.84.98 (random example) translates to 192.168.10.53 (another random example.)

    Look in the router for NAT/PAT translation settings. Sometimes even called port or address forwarding.
    Adam TT
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    Originally Posted by AdamPI
    There's two ways this can be done. One is to have basically a DMZ sort of network setup. This requires that your static devices be outside the router and have all the IP information on them individually. The important piece is that the gateway address is then the ISP's router (the same as whatever your Netopia gets via DHCP from the modem.)

    The other way, and the most likely, is to use a 1-to-1 NAT translation. Your internal devices will have a 192.168.x.x address (although you probably want to nail those statically, too) and the router's config says that anytime the 17.75.84.98 (random example) translates to 192.168.10.53 (another random example.)

    Look in the router for NAT/PAT translation settings. Sometimes even called port or address forwarding.
    Yeah. I'm going to have to look into the DMZ type deal (which will be a learning experience for me). I don't think the 1-to-1 will work because we can any number of people come into the office with their laptops and need to get on the network. If I do the 1-to-1 wouldn't I have to configure the router each time?
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    No, you only setup the 1-to-1 for your statics. Everyone else comes in under the normal translation. I guess I left out a key piece; ONE of your IP's will be used for general traffic. 99% of Internet traffic will go out through that IP, meaning it should be for all normal staff.

    One caution I should let you know is that putting a staticlly-linked machine with inbound traffic on your internal network is a security no-no. DMZ would put those machines outside your normal internal network and thus any security breaches would be limited outside your network.
    Adam TT

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