#1
  1. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    260
    Rep Power
    0

    Wireless behind switch


    Ok, we have a switch that does our DHCP from range 10.51.200.100 to 10.51.200.200

    We installed a wireless router from one of his ports just to have a wireless access point for foreign laptops and smartphones.

    In the router configuration, we stated that the router must act as DHCP server too, to be able to give IP adresses, but is it okay to change the IP range? We stated 192.168.5.100 to 192.168.5.200.

    Is that ok to have a switch that gives a different range (10.51.200.x) from the wireless router (192.168.5.x)?

    What happens is that a laptop connecting wirelessly to the router will have a 192.168.5.xxx IP, and a computer won't be able to connect to it with his IP, am I right?

    If it's not a ok scenario, what would be the good scenario to have all people under the same range without a glitch?

    Thanks all
  2. #2
  3. Did you steal it?
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    14,007
    Rep Power
    9398
    That's fine. You must have two different subnets or else there would be conflicts.

    So are you having a problem? It sounds like you're just speculating that there might be. As I understand it there shouldn't be a problem but honestly I'm not an expert with networking (I have a router, switch, and a few devices, and I'm learning as things come up).
  4. #3
  5. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Regular (2000 - 2499 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    surfing the interwebz
    Posts
    2,410
    Rep Power
    2005
    If you take the wireless router out of the equation, how does everything get to the internet?

    What I suspect is happening is that your devices hooked up to the switch are getting a 10.x.x.x IP address, and the devices connecting to your wireless "access point" (probably actually has routing built into it) are getting a 192.x.x.x IP from the wireless router. You have two distinct networks at work here. This is fine provided the router can route in between them.

    The easiest thing to do is to assign the router an IP within the 10.51.200.2-99 range (outside of the DHCP range the switch is automatically handing out). Then turn DHCP off on the wireless router/access point. Now things should be able to connect to it and get the the 10.x.x.x network/internet.
  6. #4
  7. Automagically Delicious
    Devshed Regular (2000 - 2499 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    127.0.0.2 - I live next door.
    Posts
    2,200
    Rep Power
    2737
    Keep in mind that a switch does not hand out addresses nor does it *operate* in ANY network range. It can have a *management* address, which would of course exist within some subnet, but does not require one.

    That being said it might help for you to picture each subnet onto itself; which can overlap some devices given the use of VLAN tagging.
    Adam TT

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo