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    How to mix 10mbit and 100mbit without degradation


    Sorry for if this is a dopey question, but how can I mix devices of different speeds without degrading the whole network?

    Specifically, I have a couple of devices that run at 10mbit. All the rest run at 100mbit. How can I ensure that 100mbit devices can talk to each other at maximum speed? As I understand it, having one slow device slows down my whole network.
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    Having one 10mb device on a 10/100 network DOES NOT SLOW THE ENTIRE NETWORK DOWN.

    100mbps systems will talk to 100mbps systems at 100mbps. 10mbps systems will talk to 100mb systems but only at 10mb since its the interface between the pc's nic and the port in the hub/switch that determine the bandwidth.
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    just to expand on wanderer2's comment.

    You will need a 10/100 switch to do that... If you get a hub/repeater, they will only work at 10 or 100 mbps... Just be certian what you have will support 10 and 100 connections concurrently.
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    I'm clearer on this, but still confused from the two responses that are conflicting a bit:

    nterface between the pc's nic and the port in the hub/switch that determine the bandwidth
    If you get a hub/repeater, they will only work at 10 or 100 mbps
    I think the second is correct, that a hub can run at only one speed. (And it picks the lowest one in the network). If I have this right, all I need is a switch, correct?
    Last edited by mpk; January 7th, 2004 at 02:26 PM.
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    Right... Just make sure the switch supports 10 amd 100 mbps..
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    locate the switch port of that workstation and configure it to 10 mbps and thats it...
    about your 10 mbps system slowing down the network, no it wont...
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    Originally posted by mpk
    I'm clearer on this, but still confused from the two responses that are conflicting a bit:




    I think the second is correct, that a hub can run at only one speed. (And it picks the lowest one in the network). If I have this right, all I need is a switch, correct?
    Typically ports can operate at different speeds, so it is possible that one port is 100mb and another is 10mb.

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