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    Fixed IP internet connection problems


    Here’s the problem. I have a network with cabled and wifi connections to the gateway router. The wifi connections connect the network and the internet no problem. The cabled connections connect the network ok, but cannot connect to the internet. I get 400 error Bad Request for any attempt to browse the web.

    The wifi connections use DHCP in the range 192.168.1.100-149. The LAN connects are using fixed IPs assigned at the NIC in the range 192.168.1.10-52. The router is 192.168.1.1 and cabled to 2 access points (DHCP and NAT disabled) 192.168.1.2 and 3. At each NIC the fixed IP setting is 192.168.1.10-54, subnet mask 255.255.255.0. Now the LAN cabled connections are cabled to either the gateway or one of the access points. I had originally set the default gateway to 192.168.1.1 but have tried .2 and .3 (these are the access point fixed IPS, trying to get the internet connection going). If I look at the network connection it does say there is Internet Access but all my browsing attempts comeback with an error 400 Bad Request.

    BTW, the cabled connections are servers which do not need to be internet connected on an ongoing basis except to update virus definitions, or other OS updates. I have experimented with a wifi dongle on each when I need it to connect the internet and that seems ok but I would like, instead, to be able to go to the router and just set the internet accessibility times for those machines using the LAN cabling

    Additional info. the LAN cabled PCs are WinXP Pro and Windows Server 2008
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    can you do an ipconfig /all on one of the boxes that doesn't work? Let's check the setup there. Also, the gateway you had should be correct (192.168.1.1) since it's the router.

    Also try a nslookup for a commone website (www.microsoft.com or www.google.com)

    Also ping one of those addresses.

    If you can lookup OK, and you can ping ok, it's not a connection problem.
    Adam TT
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    In short...working from one of the problem PCs all the wifi and LAN PCs can ping each other no problem. NSLOOKUP returns an error ...unknown server...'

    From the CMD prompt...the ipconfig /all you requested is down at the bottom.

    Thanks for your attention.

    Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7600]
    Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    C:\Users\Administrator>ping 192.168.1.102 (this pings a wifi connected laptop with internet access)

    Pinging 192.168.1.102 with 32 bytes of data:
    Reply from 192.168.1.102: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.102: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.102: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.102: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=128

    Ping statistics for 192.168.1.102:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 1ms, Maximum = 20ms, Average = 6ms

    C:\Users\Administrator>ping 192.168.1.50 (this pings a LAN connected PC with a fixed IP)

    Pinging 192.168.1.50 with 32 bytes of data:
    Reply from 192.168.1.50: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.50: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.50: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.50: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

    Ping statistics for 192.168.1.50:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

    C:\Users\Administrator>ping 192.168.1.51 (this pings a LAN connected PC with a fixed IP)

    Pinging 192.168.1.51 with 32 bytes of data:
    Reply from 192.168.1.51: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.51: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.51: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.51: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

    Ping statistics for 192.168.1.51:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms

    C:\Users\Administrator>ping 192.168.1.52 (this pings a LAN connected PC with a fixed IP)

    Pinging 192.168.1.52 with 32 bytes of data:
    Reply from 192.168.1.52: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.52: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.52: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.52: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

    Ping statistics for 192.168.1.52:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

    C:\Users\Administrator>nslookup microsoft.com (nsLookup from the LAN connected PC)
    Server: UnKnown
    Address: fec0:0:0:ffff::1

    *** UnKnown can't find microsoft.com: No response from server

    C:\Users\Administrator>nslookup google.com (nsLookup from the LAN connected PC)
    Server: UnKnown
    Address: fec0:0:0:ffff::1

    *** UnKnown can't find google.com: No response from server

    C:\Users\Administrator>ipconfig /all (ipconfig form the LAN connected PC)

    Windows IP Configuration

    Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : WIN-ULICHJN8O6C
    Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
    IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

    Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) 82578DC Gigabit Network Connecti
    on
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : E0-69-95-01-F1-25
    DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::b1f3:30d7:f175:fc71%11(Preferred)
    IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.10(Preferred)
    Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 249588117
    DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-15-19-B3-D3-E0-69-95-01-F1-25

    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
    fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
    fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
    NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

    Tunnel adapter isatap.{CA8182AE-A4F8-401B-81C2-4224216EAB3D}:

    Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
    DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

    Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

    Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
    DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

    C:\Users\Administrator>
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    Looks like you have no DNS servers listed. In your configuration you need to list 192.168.0.1 as a DNS Server. Actually, the preferred one will be your ISP's DNS server, so find out what those are (two is better than one) and put that in.
    Adam TT
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    Originally Posted by AdamPI
    Looks like you have no DNS servers listed. In your configuration you need to list 192.168.0.1 as a DNS Server. Actually, the preferred one will be your ISP's DNS server, so find out what those are (two is better than one) and put that in.
    To clarify then, for each NIC to which I have a static IP defined I need to define a DNS server 192.168.0.1, and preferable a second one from the ISP, is this correct?

    On a side note, is this a standard set up, the DNS server? My software vendor who set up those static IP boxes had been struggling with the missing internet connection for 3 weeks before I took it up. Should they have known this, since their application is the one that required static IPs?
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    the 192.168.0.1 is a good start, good troubleshooting because most SOHO routers will also pass on DNS queries. Ideally you should have 2 from your ISP. Try pinging any of these:
    Code:
    H:\>nslookup www.google.com
    Server:  adusac-t33.usac.mmm.com
    Address:  169.10.8.5
    
    Non-authoritative answer:
    Name:    www.l.google.com
    Addresses:  74.125.93.104
              74.125.93.105
              74.125.93.106
              74.125.93.147
              74.125.93.99
              74.125.93.103
    Aliases:  www.google.com
    If any of those ping right (from one of the non-working computers) your *connection* is fine. It's your inability to look up DNS hostnames that is the problem. And yes, if this is the solution that works it out any basic level of troubleshooting should have caught this.

    Comments on this post

    • wunof11 agrees : Methodical problem solving. Expert support didn't talk down to the user.
    Adam TT
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    PRoblem Solved


    Originally Posted by AdamPI
    the 192.168.0.1 is a good start, good troubleshooting because most SOHO routers will also pass on DNS queries. Ideally you should have 2 from your ISP. Try pinging any of these:
    Code:
    H:\>nslookup www.google.com
    Server:  adusac-t33.usac.mmm.com
    Address:  169.10.8.5
    
    Non-authoritative answer:
    Name:    www.l.google.com
    Addresses:  74.125.93.104
              74.125.93.105
              74.125.93.106
              74.125.93.147
              74.125.93.99
              74.125.93.103
    Aliases:  www.google.com
    If any of those ping right (from one of the non-working computers) your *connection* is fine. It's your inability to look up DNS hostnames that is the problem. And yes, if this is the solution that works it out any basic level of troubleshooting should have caught this.
    Outstanding AdamPI!!

    As you predicted, I was able to ping the Google addresses no problem. I got two DNS servers from my ISP by 'ipconfig /all' from the wifi connected machines. After entering them in the DNS servers of the static IP set ups I got my connection.

    I'm now trying to figure out how to bill my vendor for something they should have been able to do. Even if all they did was get on one of these forums...

    Thanks again!!
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    Glad to see it was an easy one. Taking things out one piece at a time is the ONLY way to effectively troubleshoot. There are several ways to go about it, but in the end, it comes down to: eliminate, test, repeat.
    Adam TT

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