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    ASP.net or PHP ??


    I was wondering if someone might be able to steer me in the right direction, as to which server side technology would be the better choice to concentrate my efforts. I know some php and I am starting to learn a little ASP.net. At a glance, it seems that ASP.net just blows PHP out of the water, as far as capability is concerned. However, I am enthralled with the idea of open source. What I am more concerned with is the direction of the industry as a whole. Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
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    Well, this is biased because PHP is my *native language*. Not really, PERL is.
    I would go with PHP, but of course, I haven't take a look at ASP, and not sure what the percentage of hosts that support ASP, I can pretty much asure you, that there might be more PHP support out there.
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    I think typically there is much more support for PHP. I would guess the reason would be that Apache is free and awesome. From preliminary research, support for ASP.net is out there, but a little pricy. To be honest, I am a little biased also. The main reason being that it seems that ASP.net is MUCH slower. I am running IIs for ASP.net and Apache2 for PHP, and as far as speed is concerned, PHP is the clear winner. Thanks for the reply.
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    I'm a huge fan of PHP. However, personally, I think the answer to your question depends on your reason for learning a server-side language in the first place.

    If you're leaning it for personal use, stick with PHP. It's widely supported on multiple platforms, can do just about anything you want to do and is relatively easy to learn.

    If you're learning so you can get a job, learn ASP/ASP.NET and/or JSP. Personally, I don't think PHP has deep enough penetration in corporate IT departments yet to warrant learning it vs. ASP.NET and/or JSP. Bottom line is, you'll get more work if you know ASP/ASP.NET or JSP than if you just know PHP.

    Whatever you choose, the most important thing is to get a good, solid grasp of programming. Once you do that, then learning new languages is relatively easy.
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    Very cool. I know what you are talking about with the solid grasp on programming. I have some intermediate knowledge of PHP, Actionscript, and Javascript. It took me a little while to grasp the concepts of OOP. Once I did, everything became a little clearer. And as I moved on to different languages, I seemed to pick up on them faster. I wanted to start in on C# or one of the other "big" ones, but while working through a little intro to XML on W3schools, it seemed that the standards are steering away from executables, and leaning more towards scripting type languages. As an example of the technology they were gearing their standards towards, they used ASP.net.
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    If you also want to learn C#, ASP.NET would be the way to go. With ASP.NET, you can use C# and you can do code-behind to separate your application logic from the presentation. However, one thing to keep in mind with ASP.NET, C# and the other ASP.NET supported languages is that you're basically setting yourself up to get stuck with the Windows platform.

    If you don't want to get stuck with just the Windows platform, you may want to look into Java/JSP. You're probably safer as far as sticking to standards with Java/JSP than you are with anything Microsoft.

    Of course, PHP is still a very viable choice if you're not too worried about finding work. PHP is also an excellent choice if you're going to be doing freelance web development for smaller companies and/or individuals. It's cheap, it can do a lot and there are plenty of hosts that support PHP.

    Check out this Zend News Release concerning PHP and Java. After you read this, you may decide that learning Java and PHP is a good choice for the future.
    Last edited by micros_bytes; November 24th, 2003 at 09:40 PM.
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    Yes, I agree. I understand that once I commit to ASP.net, I am marrying myself to IIS, which is, by my best preliminary judgment, about the slowest thing I ever say. Thanks for the direction. I will look into the link.
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    PHP's great for small companies that have a tight budget.
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    But what about small companies that want to expand in the future? Can PHP handle the workload of an amazon.com?
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    PHP 5 should become the great challenger of ASP.NET, but I don't know when that is going to be released.
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    What's so amazing about this PHP5 that seems to be a healer-of-all-diseases that will challenge a platform like .NET? ....yes bc asp.net is just a part of a framework

    Have you read anything about longhorn? .NET will be 'inside' of it; the new API will be mostly OOP and in managed code, so if you have a windows in front of you today sticking with .NET will be the smartest choice.... if you plan to a have a good job
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    I think that deals more towards developing apps for windows. What I am more concerned with here is picking the best and most powerful tool to develop web apps.
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    so if you have a windows in front of you today sticking with .NET will be the smartest choice.... if you plan to a have a good job
    Geez, a little harsh aren't we! I think you need to re-phrase that... How about

    sticking with .NET will be the smartest choice.... if you prefer the .NET framework to alternatives

    or

    sticking with .NET will be the smartest choice.... if you believe that the majority of large coroporations will stick with Microsoft in future, and you want to work for a large coroporation

    or

    sticking with .NET will be the smartest choice.... if you hate children. You don't hate children... do you?

    Seriously, I have a job writing open soruce programming languages, and I love it. I don't see how someone can say you won't find a good job unless you learn microsoft.

    Can PHP handle the workload of an amazon.com?
    Absolutly! A quick search at google turned up this page:
    http://news.netcraft.com/archives/20...n_windows.html

    Notice the line:
    "Enterprise sites which use PHP on Windows include Nokia, Valero, Sony and Electronic Arts." Those are not small companies we are talking about here!
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    Notice the line: "Enterprise sites which use PHP on Windows include Nokia, Valero, Sony and Electronic Arts." Those are not small companies we are talking about here!
    Have you clicked through these sites to see if they are using PHP for mission critical, enterprise web apps or are they using it for parts of their site and using ASP or JSP for the true web apps?

    When I went to www.sony.com and clicked through to the playstation section, guess what it's running....ASP.net

    When I clicked through to Sony's new online support site at http://www.iq.sony.com, quess what it's running... ASP

    When I clicked on their store locator, I found that they are using PERL.

    Also, here's the URL from the Electronic Arts homepage. They are using JSP.

    http://www.ea.com/home/home.jsp

    I could probably go on with more but I won't.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to knock PHP because I personally love it and wish that I could use it on most of my projects at work. However, I think it's important to be realistic at the same time.

    Is PHP a great web development language? Absolutely
    Is PHP gaining support and popularity? Absolutely
    Has PHP penetrated the corporate IT world to the extent that a lot of Corporate IT managers for major corporations are willing to use it in mission critical apps? No... Not yet
    Will it penetrate Corp. IT Depts. to that extent? I hope so

    However, as things stand right now, for people wanting to get into web development as a career, ASP, ASP.NET and Java/JSP would be the wise choices.

    It's very likely that they are running PHP, but they don't seem to be using it for anything critical. The Netcraft reports don't tell you what a site is doing with PHP. The reports just tell you that a site has it installed and running on the web server.
    Last edited by micros_bytes; November 25th, 2003 at 11:29 PM.
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    That is very interesting. The question I would like answered is: Are the larger IT dept's not using PHP because it is not powerful or dependable enough to handle the mission critical apps? Or are they just more familiar with ASP and JSP? Maybe someone can bring to the argument specifically in which areas either PHP or ASP.net excels.
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