Thread: About LAMP jobs

    #1
  1. A Change of Season
    Devshed Frequenter (2500 - 2999 posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Nobbies beach, Gold Coast. It's beautiful.
    Posts
    2,574
    Rep Power
    171

    About LAMP jobs


    Yeah, Linux, Apache, Mysql, Php

    Why are these job descriptions so vague? For example
    In-depth understanding of LAMP Web centric user interface design.

    Big Plus: Understanding of Unix/Linux fundamentals and system administration

    Big Plus: Knowledge of networking, sockets, file systems, etc.
    In-depth understanding of LAMP or Big Plus: Understanding of Unix/Linux fundamentals?????? Are they looking for someone with in-depth understanding of LAMP? Or it's just big plus to know Linux fundamentals?

    In depth understanding of LAMP? Does it mean a guru in Linux, Apache, Mysql and Php? I notice its usally doesn't work like that.

    In this forum for example, Rudy is the database Guru, ManiacDan answers very specific questions, Northie is very specific subjects. Linux people are even more specific. I see people in MYSQL.COM forum are VERY specific in what they know.

    What are these guys looking for?


    The other thing that does NOT make any sense: @+ years of experience?

    Well I KNOW quite few gurus that don't even have a website or resume. Tehy can't prove any of this but they CAN CODE. I myself have been coding for years and years but that does not mean anything.

    How does it work in real world? What is the qualities companies look for?

    - 2+ years of solid professional PHP development experience
    - LAMP; Linux, PHP, MySQL skills
    - Zend experience
    - Object Oriented Design methodologies
    - Strong back end / server side development skills
    - Computer Science degree is a plus
    - HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery
    Experience designing, implementing, developing and delivering advanced PHP web applications; Zend Framework experience (although other MVC frameworks like Symfony & CakePHP are relevant);
    Past experience as a developer on an enterprise project that used LAMP technologies, with a demonstrated ability to articulate the architectural solution and the solutions applied;
    Thorough understanding of MVC design patterns with the ability to articulate specific solutions through past experiences;
    Ability to develop for scalability including understanding advanced database issues, clustering, and caching;
    Hands-on ability with MySql, including advanced database design, query generation, performance tuning and profiling in high volume environment;
    Working knowledge with front-end technologies, especially jQuery;
    Understanding and dedication to software development best practices including familiarity with agile development methodologies;
    Strong experience with design-for-testability and unit-tests;
    Version control experience with Subversion (or Git);
    Enough understanding of Apache Web Server to maintain a development environment and to support production issues;
    Excellent problem solving and communication skills both spoken and written;
    Proven ability to work in concert with other developers and teams, but also possess the ability to work independently to create solutions.
    2+ years of LAMP development experience
  2. #2
  3. Code Monkey V. 0.9
    Devshed Regular (2000 - 2499 posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    A Land Down Under
    Posts
    2,066
    Rep Power
    1990
    99% of job ads like that are created by HR departments from dot-points given to them from the IT department manager. The manager knows just enough to get himself into trouble, and HR know nothing at all. To get a look-in with a job like that you need to have the correct buzz-words of the day in your cover letter to get through the HR vetting process and onto the manager in charge. That's all there is to it.

    You will find that there are some very rare cases where specific talent is required, and ads like that will normally be written by the person that knows what is needed and knows the applicant that they'll need to fill that role. These are going to be very easy to pick.
  4. #3
  5. A Change of Season
    Devshed Frequenter (2500 - 2999 posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Nobbies beach, Gold Coast. It's beautiful.
    Posts
    2,574
    Rep Power
    171
    Originally Posted by Catacaustic
    99% of job ads like that are created by HR departments from dot-points given to them from the IT department manager. The manager knows just enough to get himself into trouble, and HR know nothing at all. To get a look-in with a job like that you need to have the correct buzz-words of the day in your cover letter to get through the HR vetting process and onto the manager in charge. That's all there is to it.

    You will find that there are some very rare cases where specific talent is required, and ads like that will normally be written by the person that knows what is needed and knows the applicant that they'll need to fill that role. These are going to be very easy to pick.
    Are you still in Brisbane?
  6. #4
  7. Code Monkey V. 0.9
    Devshed Regular (2000 - 2499 posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    A Land Down Under
    Posts
    2,066
    Rep Power
    1990
    Yes I am... But I haven't been looking for jobs for a fair while now.
  8. #5
  9. A Change of Season
    Devshed Frequenter (2500 - 2999 posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Nobbies beach, Gold Coast. It's beautiful.
    Posts
    2,574
    Rep Power
    171
    Originally Posted by Catacaustic
    Yes I am... But I haven't been looking for jobs for a fair while now.
    Ever come to Gold Coast?
  10. #6
  11. Code Monkey V. 0.9
    Devshed Regular (2000 - 2499 posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    A Land Down Under
    Posts
    2,066
    Rep Power
    1990
    Not often any more.
  12. #7
  13. Web Developer/Musician
    Devshed Regular (2000 - 2499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tennessee Mountains
    Posts
    2,407
    Rep Power
    1031
    Originally Posted by English Breakfast Tea
    Yeah, Linux, Apache, Mysql, Php

    Why are these job descriptions so vague? For exampleIn-depth understanding of LAMP or Big Plus: Understanding of Unix/Linux fundamentals?????? Are they looking for someone with in-depth understanding of LAMP? Or it's just big plus to know Linux fundamentals?

    In depth understanding of LAMP? Does it mean a guru in Linux, Apache, Mysql and Php? I notice its usally doesn't work like that.
    Understanding does not necessarily mean guru level knowledge in all of it. If you are a LAMP developer you may be called upon to not just code in PHP, but install MySQL and Apache and PHP, edit or create Apache and mysql config files, and use the command line to set up development environments (directory and file commands). That doesn't mean you need to know how to do Linux administration, or MySQL replication or advanced Apache config. It might be useful to know but it's likely they have a sys admin for those things.

    If for instance the shop uses git or some other means of version control, you will likely need to set up a dev environment on your personal machine. They would then likelty be looking for someone who can do that without someone else having to do it for you. In other words learn how to set up the tools you will be using. Being able to take a blank machine and turn it into a LAMP server is a good grounding for a LAMP dev to have.


    The other thing that does NOT make any sense: @+ years of experience?

    Well I KNOW quite few gurus that don't even have a website or resume. Tehy can't prove any of this but they CAN CODE. I myself have been coding for years and years but that does not mean anything.
    They have to use some sort of yardstick for your knowledge. Be glad most employers allow "equivelent experience" along with the preference for a computer science degree. If you don't have the years of experience then you better have a lot of code samples to show that you know what you are doing. That is if they even give you a chance to show them.

    I know the feeling. I am self taught and fifteen years ago had no practical experience. I had to sell my hard earned knowledge the best I could. I didn't go to college to get that knowledge but now work right along side people who have those degrees.

    You aren't going to get the prime jobs. The best you can do to get experience is to join open source efforts, sell your own apps and do technical writing (if you know what you are talking about) all of which are easier to do now then they ever have been.

    The other thing you are going to run into is that a company is going to choose a particular product such as a database product to use and they insist you "know" that product. Unfortunately you can have 10 years working with MySQL under your belt, but if they use Oracle, they may not be aware that anyone with 10 years experience working with MySQL isn't going to be lost using Oracle, or SQL Server, or Postgres or.... At least be aware of the differences between those products so that in an interview, if they ask you about a product you have never used, you can demonstrate that you won't be lost using it.
  14. #8
  15. Sarcky
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    10,692
    Rep Power
    6351
    In this forum for example, Rudy is the database Guru, ManiacDan answers very specific questions, Northie is very specific subjects. Linux people are even more specific. I see people in MYSQL.COM forum are VERY specific in what they know.
    Rudy is a demigod of SQL, but that doesn't mean that the rest of us don't know anything. I've been a database administrator, linux server administrator, and I've worked in Linux for the last 6 years. I still bow to superior knowledge because I accept that people specialize.

    The other thing that does NOT make any sense: @+ years of experience?

    Well I KNOW quite few gurus that don't even have a website or resume. Tehy can't prove any of this but they CAN CODE. I myself have been coding for years and years but that does not mean anything.

    How does it work in real world? What is the qualities companies look for?
    Why does it not make sense that they require experience? When I'm hiring someone, I need to make sure they know their stuff, and they can handle the work load. I can't just simply trust them, they're strangers. I wouldn't need to see Requinix's resume (and in fact offered him a job just last week, which he ignored. Ahem.), but I'd need to see yours, or some random guy coming in off Monster.com. They need to make sure you're as good as you say (by testing you, looking at code samples, or browing your website) and that you can function in a work environment (either through a personality test, an extended interview, or by asking your past employers).

    99% of job ads like that are created by HR departments from dot-points given to them from the IT department manager. The manager knows just enough to get himself into trouble, and HR know nothing at all. To get a look-in with a job like that you need to have the correct buzz-words of the day in your cover letter to get through the HR vetting process and onto the manager in charge. That's all there is to it.
    This is also very true. IT managers are almost always raised to the level of their incompetence and left there. HR managers are often the in-law of the CFO or some other useless functionary. Nobody really knows what the job entails, and that's why the job listings are just a bulleted list of the buzzwords they overheard while wandering the office.

    You aren't going to get the prime jobs. The best you can do to get experience is to join open source efforts, sell your own apps and do technical writing (if you know what you are talking about) all of which are easier to do now then they ever have been.
    This is sadly true. However, if you make a name for yourself in some online community, that can count for a lot. I happened to run into a mod of PHPFreaks who runs a company that I interviewed with. He recognized "ManiacDan" on my resume (which lists my positions both here and on PHPF) and had very few technical questions for me because he already knew what I could do with PHP (and, to a lesser extent, SQL and other things).
    HEY! YOU! Read the New User Guide and Forum Rules

    "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." -Benjamin Franklin

    "The greatest tragedy of this changing society is that people who never knew what it was like before will simply assume that this is the way things are supposed to be." -2600 Magazine, Fall 2002

    Think we're being rude? Maybe you asked a bad question or you're a Help Vampire. Trying to argue intelligently? Please read this.
  16. #9
  17. A Change of Season
    Devshed Frequenter (2500 - 2999 posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Nobbies beach, Gold Coast. It's beautiful.
    Posts
    2,574
    Rep Power
    171
    Originally Posted by ManiacDan
    I've been a database administrator
    Can you please write a brief list of what you had to do as dba?
    Originally Posted by ManiacDan
    linux server administrator, and I've worked in Linux for the last 6 years. I still bow to superior knowledge because I accept that people specialise.
    Please briefly explain what you did as Linux Server admin without superior knowledge. Preferably mention semi-brief list of your responsibilities.

    Originally Posted by ManiacDan
    (and in fact offered him a job just last week, which he ignored. Ahem.)
    He/she is a mystery


    And at the end, what are the "prime Jobs"? Positions with +100 k a year? +200 a year?
  18. #10
  19. Web Developer/Musician
    Devshed Regular (2000 - 2499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tennessee Mountains
    Posts
    2,407
    Rep Power
    1031
    You won't get much higher than 100k with php unless you do project management. Java, C++, .NET will get you more. I once saw a listing for someone to do Facebook pages for 85k yr so I suppose you might get lucky and get more. Starting out I would not count on much more than 40.
  20. #11
  21. A Change of Season
    Devshed Frequenter (2500 - 2999 posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Nobbies beach, Gold Coast. It's beautiful.
    Posts
    2,574
    Rep Power
    171
    Originally Posted by Hammer65
    You won't get much higher than 100k with php unless you do project management.
    Do you mean something like this? Or are you speaking about 5 years of experience of PM?
  22. #12
  23. Web Developer/Musician
    Devshed Regular (2000 - 2499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tennessee Mountains
    Posts
    2,407
    Rep Power
    1031
    Originally Posted by English Breakfast Tea
    Do you mean something like this? Or are you speaking about 5 years of experience of PM?
    You can get trained and certified in project management if you like. There are certifications in project management and then there is the certified scrum master which is in the Agile/scrum methodology. Very popular at the moment. In order to reach above $100k you would have to be a "lead" developer and do some sort of managment of a team of developers. You don't get that for just being a normal dev on a team or even a lone dev.

    Most listings I've seen for high end pay require a computer science degree or equivelant experience that ranges from around 6 years and up depending on what that experience is. Again development and marketing of your own app, being a major part of an open source project, tutorial writing and prolific freelance work can all look good as experience if you don't have practical experience with a company developing.
  24. #13
  25. Sarcky
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    10,692
    Rep Power
    6351
    Can you please write a brief list of what you had to do as dba?

    Please briefly explain what you did as Linux Server admin without superior knowledge. Preferably mention semi-brief list of your responsibilities.
    I'm not going to take the time to write out full job descriptions, but I've been the sole technical person at a web company before. I had to actually buy the server, configure it, and manage it entirely on my own. I designed the database, tweaked the settings, installed the webserver, managed security patches, wrote the whole site, etc.

    And at the end, what are the "prime Jobs"? Positions with +100 k a year? +200 a year?
    You won't get much higher than 100k with php unless you do project management
    I've actually found PHP jobs to max out higher than what Hammer has experienced. I've seen US$120k for a senior PHP developer, though the real money comes from stock in startups.

    Starting out I would not count on much more than 40.
    This is definitely true unless you have a very impressive portfolio or a degree from a very impressive school. Even then, don't bet on more than US$70k.
    HEY! YOU! Read the New User Guide and Forum Rules

    "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." -Benjamin Franklin

    "The greatest tragedy of this changing society is that people who never knew what it was like before will simply assume that this is the way things are supposed to be." -2600 Magazine, Fall 2002

    Think we're being rude? Maybe you asked a bad question or you're a Help Vampire. Trying to argue intelligently? Please read this.

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo