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    Not sure if this is the right place for this question, but I'll give it a shot. Please excuse me if I'm off topic.

    I've been developing php/mysql-driven web sites for some time now, and thought that I would set up my own linux/apache/php/mysql web server to test and develop sites on.

    The question is: which Linux distribution should I get? I don't want a typical 'newbie' distrib. since I plan on learning the OS in depth. I would rather have a more 'hardcore' one. I'm not going to run that many apps other than the ones required for the server, since I'm using WinMil for my daily work and play.

    Sorry for the somewhat lengthy post, but if someone could give me an answer as to the pros and cons of some of the different distributions I would be greatful.

    Thanks,

    CJ Kihlbom

    ------------------

    ::cj.kihlbom:: cj@kihlbom.com ::
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    freebsd
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    >>I don't want a typical 'newbie' distrib

    Then Redhat or Mandrake is not for you.

    >>I've been developing php/mysql-driven web sites for some time now

    It depends on how much UNIX experience you have. Having web developing skills dosn't make you an intermediate *INUX user. You still need a newbie distrib to begin with. When you are no longer a newbie, you should give FreeBSD a try. Once you tried FreeBSD, you will never go back to Linux.

    Should you go for Redhat or Mandrake, don't give RPM packages a high expectation. All of your apache/php/mysql should be compiled from source.

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    Maybe you should try Slackware or Cobalt Linux. I worked with them and they are not all that bad. However, freebsd is right: when you acquire enough knowledge you should get some real UNIX. FreeBSD is one of the best free UNIX systems I tried.
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    I have some Linux experience, since I've been Telnet-ing to my web hosts Linux machine, and I plan to buy a couple of books on th e subject, such as Running Linux and Linux in a Nutshell. Any other suggestions?

    I've been thinking about FreeBSD, which seems really cool. My main concern though is about hardware support. Since the computer is gonna double as a gaming rig it will have a GeForce-card, DVD-player, etc. Will these be supported? WIll they be supported in Linux?

    Thanks for your replies.

    / CJ
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    >>it will have a GeForce-card, DVD-player, etc. Will these be supported?

    Yes.

    As far as your hardware is concern, you should NEVER get any USB device/hardware.

    >>since I plan on learning the OS in depth

    Then get FreeBSD, forget about Linux.
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    Sounds good.

    Do you know of any good books on the subject?
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    >>any good books?

    No. Just read the FreeBSD handbook online. Be sure to subscribe to FreeBSD mail list and check out their newsgroups.

    In my opinion, the ONLY advantage to choose Linux over FreeBSD is the documentation and support, no others, FreeBSD beats Linux in all other categories. Just to name the most significat two:
    1) ports system
    2) upgrading via cvsup

    In Linux, you get RPM, it can do upgrade as well, but it lacks flexibility (i.e. can't specify option and install path). Many programs come with tarball and no RPM available. Upgrading is a pain for Linux, you almost have to wipe out the OS and install the new version.

    Talking about documentation, if you do things right and RTFM, you don't really need to rely on documentation or ask for help. FreeBSD users are always highly self-motivated.
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    I will second the above, having gone through several Linux distributions before trying FreeBSD. Some Linux distros default to sexier graphics and cool toys, but when it comes to a server, FreeBSD beats them all (not just Linux). It's got the best balance of performance flexibility, and stability I've seen in ANY OS. Why do you think Apple used it as the basis of OS X?

    FreeBSD also makes you learn how a real Unix works. You can do most of the same things with Linux, in principle, but you are usually shielded by some sort of extra interface, be it in terminal mode, or X-windows.

    For what it's worth, I have found Slackware to be the most similar to FreeBSD (haven't tried Debian). I don't belittle the accomplishments of the Linux effort. I think it's done the industry a lot of good, and I am hoping for some cool things to come out of the next release. It looks very promising for other (non-server/graphics/gaming) computing needs, but it will have a long way to go to achieve the elegant simplicity of FreeBSD.
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    In addition, to most Linux users or simply windows users, FreeBSD seems to have less programs to play with comparing to Linux. In reality FreeBSD actually has more. Not to mention FreeBSD has Linux emulator.


    No doubt, Linux has far more market share than FreeBSD. People might think cuz Linux is a better kernel/OS, therefore we are more popular than FreeBSD. Such way of thought is absolutely wrong. Linux is more user-friendly and easier to use, so for those who migrates from win32 (newbie to the UNIX world) often start with Linux.


    In fact, as a FreeBSD user like me, I don't want to see FreeBSD to gain more market share. Fewer people run FreeBSD make a proud of myself.

    [This message has been edited by freebsd (edited September 04, 2000).]
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    I would have to agree that FreeBSD is better then Linux, for now........


    I have integreted systems (dual 400 pent II's, 256 megs of ram; on each computer).
    I had one Win 2000, one win98 (using apache, it was my slowest machine cause 98 doesn't support dual processors), Mandrake Linux, SuSE linux, and FreeBSD. FreeBSD out performed both my Linux servers(proxy servering). I use SuSE linux more often then FreeBSD, because I like YAST , but I think Mandrake 7.1 is the most Newbie_Friendly version of them all. Overall, it doesn't make all that much of a difference, if it's not a large scale application.

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    Sorry, I have to put in my two cents.
    SlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareS lackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackware
    *breath*
    SlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackwareSlackware
    *breath*
    __SlackWare seems to be the simplest to install and configure, but it doesn't hide you from much. It's a really fun distribution to play with.
    __FreeBSD looks like it could be nice, but it's got more than a gig of crap to download (and that won't work on my 56k. ). For now, SlackWare does everything I want it to with minimal effort to keep it up. Software installation is a snap, I rarely find software that won't compile without being helped along (Maybe that's just the state of the software that's being released now, as opposed to a few years ago?). The SlackWare SlackPacks are very neat. They don't tell you you don't have something installed that you do, like RPM often does.
    __Well, I'm out.
  22. #12
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    freebsd
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    >>FreeBSD looks like it could be nice, but it's got more than a gig of crap to download

    All you need is to download the FreeBSD OS - approximately 200mb to 400mb (excluding the programs in /packages directory).

    In fact, you don't need those pre-compiled packages at all and yes, they are crap and just for FreeBSD newbies. Don't forget, FreeBSD has got the _port system_.

    For those who have tried FreeBSD and don't like it or can't handle it, they should go back to Linux since they are not qualify and skillful enough.

    Among those FreeBSD users out there, if they haven't tried to recompile a kernel or cvsup, they still can't call themselves a true FreeBSD user.

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