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    C Book Recommendations


    Hi guys,

    Just asking if you have good books for beginning C? I'm currently self-studying these:

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to C, 2E (Greg Perry)
    This book assumes no programming background and is very easy to understand. It can even be said that it's targeted to a younger audience, not that it is a bad thing. The book mainly covers the essential basics in C. The structure of the topics is very well laid out. The code examples are followed by code analysis. It does not have exercises to test the reader's learning at the end of the chapter, but it is strongly advised to have initiative when it comes to this.

    Programming in C, 3E (Stephen G. Kochan)
    What the other book lacks, this one has. Kochan's book has exercises at the end of each chapter that evaluates the reader's understanding of the concepts. Compared to Perry's book, it is more textbook-like and technical, but nothing over the top. It is more comprehensive and goes more in-depth, but perhaps nothing way too advanced. Kochan is also generous enough to provide an answer key to his exercises (odd numbers only), which can be found on his official forum.

    If you guys have other recommendations, I would be much interested to know. Thanks!
    Last edited by Scorpions4ever; April 20th, 2013 at 12:29 PM.
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    I learned C programming from the below book. I hope this may be help.

    The C Programming Language by Brian W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie Highly recommended
    Nobody will question a choice to buy this book. Reading this book and performing the exercises is probably the best way to become a good C programmer. The book covers most of C in detail, and does an excellent job teaching programming idioms. If you are serious about programming, you should buy this book.
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    I am at a disadvantage here because I learned both C and C++ more than 20 years ago and had already had a decade of programming experience at that time. As a result, I cannot recommend the book I had learned from (From C To C by James Gardner, 1989) since it's undoubtedly out-of-print, I am unfamiliar with the current beginning books, and I cannot evaluate the current books for whether they're suitable for beginners.

    The C Programming Language by Brian W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie is indeed a good book and should, and usually does, find its way onto every C programmer's bookshelf. Ritchie was the designer of C and for several years the first edition of this book served as the de facto C Programming Manual. It is a thin book that is tightly packed with a lot of good information. As such, it is not very beginner-friendly; it may not be easy for a beginner to digest that information easily and it assumes that you already know how to program. Thin, affordable, an essential resource for an experienced programmer, but perhaps not the best one for a beginner to programming to start with. BTW, Kernighan, a co-designer of UNIX, also invented the "Hello, world!" program. Also, you would want to get the second edition, which has "ANSI C" watermarked in red on the cover. The original form of C, called "K&R" for "Kernighan and Ritchie" and because of the first edition of this book, is a bit of a different beast.

    I do highly recommend the Schaum's Outlines Programming with C, 2nd edition, by Byron Gottfried. It's affordable at less than $20 US. It is an excellent reference and tutorial with exercises, a number of which are answered in back. Each chapter covers a different topic. The chapter on pointers alone is well worth the price of the entire book -- the end of that chapter includes a long list of different pointer declarations including arrays of pointers, pointers to arrays, and function pointers. It explains multi-dimensional arrays and their internal structure excellently. I have no practical experience with scanf because I work almost exclusively with embedded programming (non-computer devices with an embedded processor don't usually have a keyboard and monitor), but I have been able to answer a lot of scanf problems on this forum because of this book's coverage of the topic.

    Even with more than two decades of experience with C, I keep returning to Schaum's Outlines Programming with C, though not as much as P.J. Plauger's Standard C: A Reference, last revised in 1996 and undoubtedly now out-of-print.
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    I'm learning from the Book "Head First C"

    Good book, has good reviews on the internet, and a great starter. Plus, it was the only C book that was in my library :p
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    @dwise1_aol:
    Thank you for the recommendation, I added Schaum's to my ebook library.

    I found a supplementary for the Absolute Beginner's Guide to C by the same author:

    C By Example (Greg Perry)
    This book teaches by giving tons of examples. It is advised to type in the codes yourself to experience it.
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    Question


    Can anyone suggest books for a programmer who familiar with the concept of C programming but are unfamiliar to real world applications in C. A book which will give examples of read world programming(Code) and teach about flows of week code an gives exercise to develop real world application in C. Kind of Good practical stuff.

    I have another question which is not related to this post. The question is what are the carrier options available for C programmer ? Is it better than other programming languages like Java and .Net ? Reason behind asking this question is i was having subject of C programming a complete theory in my undergraduates first year. The book was also based on complete theory. But i have interest in C programming though i have not programmed any real world application in C. Can anyone suggest me what should i do ?
    Following is the link of subjects i have studied in my first year. No advance concept was there. Kindly look at the topics and books i have gone through. And suggest me what should i do ? Because I want to get job after completing my graduation.And In city i am living no job requirement for C :brrr:

    http://www.ngu.ac.in/SYLLABUS/MSCIT/SEM1/103.pdf

    http://www.ngu.ac.in/SYLLABUS/MSCIT/SEM2/203.pdf
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    Beginning C, 5E (Ivor Horton)
    The 5th edition was just released this March 2013 and should cover recent developments in the C language. What I like about this book is it has downloadable source code and solutions to exercises, which makes it a splendid book for beginning programming in C and self-studying.

    The book from Perry I'm reading now is from 1994, quite old, but still good in explaining the basics, halfway through it. I'm eager to pick up Horton's book after.

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