Thread: C++ Books

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    I know this is going to sound bad, but the C for Dummies books are not that bad.
    Some people seem to not share your opinion much, hehe.
    http://www.accu.org/bookreviews/publ.../c/c000269.htm
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...142167-5483123
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    Some people did not agree with my suggestion, but then again some did. I think if you are having difficulty understanding some things about the C language this isn't a bad place to start.
    I didn't say they were the best, but they aren't as bad as the review states, I believe the comment at the bottom of the page says a lot.
    I believe once you move past the beginner stage of programming in general you don't need a beginner book except for language reference (and in most cases you can get all of the language reference from the language "bible" so to speak) and you can jump straight into the more advanced stuff that really gets down deep into the language.
    But that is just my opinion, I could be wrong.
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    Datamike,

    I always suggest the better (but longer path): go through C first, then C++.

    Although you can get to C++ without getting the "pure C" concepts first, but after that you'll never appreciate the real value of STL in C++ unless you have actually used C without STL and Classes. :)

    K&R (as suggested in a couple of posts above) is a good "to the point" approach book for C.

    For C++, also look up books by Robert Lafore. He has 3-4 compiler-specific books too.
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    I was looking for The C Programming Language by Kernighan & Ritchie, and noticed that the lasted edition (2nd) was 1988 ('89 for paperback). Is this the book that you guys have been referring to as "The Bible" for C? I just wanted to double check before buying it.

    Thanks!
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    That's the one! :)

    K&R on Amazon
    Jon Sagara

    "Me fail English? That's unpossible!"
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    Thanks for the speedy reply. Would you recommend the solutions manual along with it?
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    Okei, first things first. After encouragement I ran the Cygwin installer again, at my home this time and got it up and running easily. I wonder what went wrong during the first two tries at my work office. I liked the Cygwin, especially the bash shell. Unfortunently it took most of my hard drive so I had to remove it. I guess it's another visit to the hardware store for extra memory.

    Thanks for the books reviews and recomendations. I've got a pretty good idea now which are popular books and what aren't. The common opinion seems to be that it's best to go through first with C and then move to C++. I don't seem to find logic in this thinking, though I respect the opinion and I guess I'll go along with it. I just want to ask, why go through the trouble of learning C if the better and more popular C++ replaces it totally?

    I know I could get this one from elsewhere, but I thought I'd still ask. What is STL? Should I try selecting books that cover STL? How about UML, should I try get it covered?
    -- Tomi Kaistila
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    Zenith:

    If you have the cash for it, then it never hurts to have example code to look at. Just make sure you give each problem your best effort before looking up the solution or you'll never learn to your full potential (sorry, I sound like an authority figure - blech). :)

    Also, the K&R is pretty dense, so in addition to it, you may want to get one of those other books that is more of a tutorial-style book.

    Datamike:

    The common opinion seems to be that it's best to go through first with C and then move to C++. I don't seem to find logic in this thinking, though I respect the opinion and I guess I'll go along with it. I just want to ask, why go through the trouble of learning C if the better and more popular C++ replaces it totally?
    With C, you can focus on learning the basics of the language, including syntax, functions, memory management, etc... You won't be distracted by fancy things from the world of OOP.

    Once you have mastered C, then you should tackle C++ and learn about classes and templates, among other C++ specific things. This is the way I learned to program, and I feel fortunate that my instructors made us do it that way.

    What is STL? Should I try selecting books that cover STL?
    STL = Standard Template Library. Google that phrase and you'll get a lot of explanations. Once you have a good grasp of templates (a C++ feature), only then should you tackle the STL.

    Incidentally, the following are some good books for learning STL:
    * STL tutorial and Reference
    * Generic Programming and the STL
    * Effective STL

    UML is something completely different. If you plan on doing any professional software development, then you'll need to know how to write requirements documents, which may include modeling objects, in which case you'll need to know UML. But you don't need to know UML in order to learn C/C++.

    HTH! :)
    Jon Sagara

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    The reason I recommend to choose the "C path" towards C++, is that you'll never realise where you can utilize the power given by C++/STL unless you try to do everything in C. Its only when you have tried fiddling with lots of linked lists, stacks in C, you come to realize the comfort given by STL's <list> and <vector> or even <string> classes. A person starting out with C++ itself would not enjoy as much using them....just my opinion. :)
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    K&R and Lafore.

    Good books. :)

    Can you find Let us C ,Pointers in C,C projects , Let us C++ by Yashwant Kanirkar.

    These books discusses all the real life problems and I find them good. But I am not sure if they are available out side India.

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    C ANSI Standard


    I did a little search in google and found a site:
    Rationale for American National Standard for Information Systems - Programming Language - C.

    To me, this looks like a pretty detailed document of the C language. A finnish online bookstore decribes The C Programming Language (y Kernighan, Brian/ Ritchie, Dennis) to be more like a book that describes the C ANSI standard. My question is, do I really need to buy a book for that porpuse?
    -- Tomi Kaistila
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    A finnish online bookstore decribes The C Programming Language (y Kernighan, Brian/ Ritchie, Dennis) to be more like a book that describes the C ANSI standard. My question is, do I really need to buy a book for that porpuse?
    Oh not at all! It's way more than that. It's a good learning book. Of course it uses ANSI C mostly (which is good), but it's definately way more than a description of the standard. As said before, it really is the ultimate book to learn C.
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    Okei dokei :)
    That's good to know.
    -- Tomi Kaistila
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    The more you learn, the more you know.
    The more you know, the more you forget.
    The more you forget, the less you know.
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    I have found that Starting Out with C++ by Tony Gaddis is a great book!:)
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    If you want to learn C++, learn C++. There's no need to learn C first. It won't make you a better C++ programmer. The two languages have diverged to the point where using either requires a different mindset. But be conscious of the fact that you're a C++ programmer, don't kid yourself into thinking you understand C. There are books around that delve straight into C++ without assuming or teaching C.

    If you want to learn both I would suggest you learn C first, then C++. It seems a fairly natural progression. Many C++ programmers have gone this route anyway, for historical reasons, and many C++ books presume a knowledge of C.

    The K&R book is still a good reference for C but it's out of date now; I'm not aware of a revision for the C99 standard. C has evolved since K&R. There are books around that cover it, for example C - A Reference Manual, Fifth Edition by Harbison & Steele, but I can't say how good it is. Perhaps as the title suggests, it's more a reference than a beginners guide.

    The 'Dummies' C++ books that I've seen are poor compared to many other books out there. If you're given a free copy for Christmas, by all means use it. If you're spending your own money, I would suggest you buy something else.

    Stroustrup's C++ Programming Language is not a good choice for a complete beginner to C++. It would probably be quite a good choice for an experienced C programmer. In either case, and in any case, I would suggest that you'll need to buy more than one book along the way.

    [edit:- oops, sorry, I've just realised the previous poster was opening up a very old thread. I guess the OP is already proficient at C or C++, or even both, by now. Or at any rate has chosen a book! Moderators, feel free to delete this post if you wish]
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