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    Learning the Qt library is a pain in the arse...


    I soaked in C pretty well, but Qt is difficult to grasp. Learning the new library I'm finding to be challenging. I'm watching Youtube tutorials and I'm reading Foundations of Qt Development. But still, it's not easy going. But how else will I create C programs with a GUI?

    Any ideas on how I can make the learning process easier for myself?
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    Have you tried qt designer? I plan to, when I get time and gui's rise in importance to me.
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    Originally Posted by b49P23TIvg
    Have you tried qt designer? I plan to, when I get time and gui's rise in importance to me.
    Yes, the designer itsel is quite simple and straightforward, but it writes everything you do in XML. But most of the tutorials about QT focus on the manual editing of SLOTS and Signals writing it out using the Qt LIbrary. So I'm a bit confused. Should I use the designer exclusively? Or learn the hard way and do it manually? Or do I have to learn both?
    I have many questions still as to what I should do.
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    Originally Posted by pditty8811
    I soaked in C pretty well, but Qt is difficult to grasp.
    This makes no sense at all, given your other thread

    > But how else will I create C programs with a GUI?
    Qt isn't the only GUI library available, there are others as well.
    Wikipedia has a list.

    However, none of them will be particularly easy for you if your knowledge of pointers is still so weak.
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    Originally Posted by pditty8811
    I soaked in C pretty well, but Qt is difficult to grasp.
    Qt is a C++ library, so in-depth knowledge of C is of limited benefit perhaps.
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    Depending on the complexity of what you are trying to create, you may need to learn both, in-depth. I have done a lot of work in metrology over the years and have often resorted to implementing very thin GUI's using various framework designers, without having to get into the guts of the framework or become an expert user of the designer. Occasionally you will encountered problems that require more complicated solutions that the designer tool isn't equipped to handle, then you get to go a bit deeper into the framework to integrate custom UI code into the solution. Sometimes you generate a prototype with the designer, then set the designer tool aside and hack on its output in ways that are incompatible with further use of the tool.
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