Thread: OZ Language

    #1
  1. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1
    Rep Power
    0

    OZ Language


    I was reviewing the MIT 2004 book
    Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming.

    I'm curious about the potencial and future of the multifaceted language OZ used in the book to show samples about a lot of programming paradigms.

    Despite the The Mozart Programming System , is the future of this language only academic?

    Or, is OZ a good future language?


    References:
    Wikipedia
    The Mozart Programming System
  2. #2
  3. fork while true;
    Devshed God 1st Plane (5500 - 5999 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    5,538
    Rep Power
    1051
    I personally don't think it's going anywhere but academia, but there's nothing to stop you doing anything with it.

    You might look at pluvo, however, interesting blend of python and lisp. Thanks netytan for pointing that out to me.
  4. #3
  5. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    394
    Rep Power
    52
    Hi!

    Originally Posted by LinuxPenguin
    You might look at pluvo, however, interesting blend of python and lisp.
    Could you show a link, please?

    Regards, mawe
  6. #4
  7. fork while true;
    Devshed God 1st Plane (5500 - 5999 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    5,538
    Rep Power
    1051
  8. #5
  9. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Novice (500 - 999 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    596
    Rep Power
    24
    Originally Posted by MindFul
    Despite the The Mozart Programming System , is the future of this language only academic?

    Or, is OZ a good future language?


    References:
    Wikipedia
    The Mozart Programming System
    Probably yes to both questions. As you know, it has some powerful features (laziness, dataflow) which could make certain difficult tasks easy, esp. re concurrency and "it's all concurrent now" so although Oz will remain an academic language unless some big company gets behind it, it may also be a future secret weapon for clever hackers, in the same way that Paul Graham describes leaving competitors standing by using a smarter set of tools. There's a sense then that it doesn't matter if these things (Lisp, Oz, Haskell) never become mainstream and begin to appeal to managers, because they can benefit those who can recognise them. And if the features are strong enough they drip into mainstream languages eventually, like the introduction of FP flavour to VB

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo