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    Well, i was thinking that i'd get this task over with. I don't like this language much, however i do have a great interest in simulations. I absolutely do not like to leave stones unturned so seeing how this simulation really works would be good as long as i follow up with the logic of the procedure.
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    Well, if it might help you give Scheme a bit more of a try, you might try going to Language:Choose Language... and setting it to 'Swindle - Full Swindle'. This will give you access to the Scheme Request For Implementation libraries, as well as to an existing OOP library called Swindle (based loosely on the CLOS, the OOP library for Common Lisp). The SRFIs are pretty widely used, so portability shouldn't be a problem; Swindle is specific to the PLT implementations, but as long as you are sticking to MzScheme/Dr Scheme, you should do fine with it, especially now that it is actually part of the standard installation. You would probably want to look at the Planet Scheme Library, the Scheme Cookbook (a collection of Scheme example code, including most of the common data structures - such as binary heaps and priority queues...), the CMU Scheme Repository, and (read scheme).

    I don't want to pressure you on it, but I really do think that Scheme has something to offer most programmers, and that understanding its more unique aspects (e.g., homoiconicity, higher-order functions , closures, continuations) will give you insights that apply to programming in general.

    A-different-sort-of-insecurity dept.: By the way, what did you think of Scheme in Short, and was it of any help to you? You might want to compare it to some of the more comprehensive tutorials, and see of they help clarify anything I didn't cover.

    This blog entry has a fairly good explanation of both closures and continuations, written mostly for Perl 6 but applicable in general. Oh, two more links, a Scheme related blog (Scheming) and a page explaining the lambda calculus (http://www.jetcafe.org/~jim/lambda.html) . HTH.

    Comments on this post

    • netytan agrees : As usual a whole bunch of good Scheme resources
    Last edited by Schol-R-LEA; April 8th, 2006 at 11:33 AM.
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    #define KINSEY (rand() % 7) λ Scheme is the Red Pill
    Scheme in Short Understanding the C/C++ Preprocessor
    Taming Python A Highly Opinionated Review of Programming Languages for the Novice, v1.1

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    The Scheme in Short did help. The Scheme Cookbook does seem to be a good resource. Thanks. A lot of reading though but it's real helpful. Now i suppose it's a matter of relating what i read... to the Simulation problem i originally wanted to conquer.
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