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    Is there a good website about assembly?


    Hi everybody.I was wondering whether anybody had a good website about assembly(of any kind,Intel or not)to recommend.I googled for assembly and found some good ones but I'd like to hear from more experienced people than me(easy since I am just starting).Thanks in advance
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    I actualy learned assembly from a book so I don't know of any good websites. Maybe you could start working with one now and if you aren't happy with the way it's going you can just start with another.
    Dear God. What is it like in your funny little brains? It must be so boring.
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    Art of Assembly e-book

    Comments on this post

    • netytan agrees : Good book!
    • displeaser agrees
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    Beginning Assembly Programming was a very good book for x86, it explains everything very clearly and went into a lot of detail so if you see it on a shelf somewhere I'd pick it up.

    If you want to play with other architectures then here are a few links and suggestions, all much cleaner than the x86 Intel's been peddling around for a-decade/decades .

    PowerPC http://www.lightsoft.co.uk/Fantasm/Beginners/begin1.html
    MIPS http://chortle.ccsu.edu/AssemblyTutorial/TutorialContents.html
    ARM (most beautiful ASM ever) http://www.peter-cockerell.net:80/aalp/html/frames.html

    I'd also recommend the ARM SOC Architecture second edition though it's not very easy in places.

    Enjoy ,

    Mark.
    programming language development: www.netytan.com Hula

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    Thanks a lot everybody.Actually,I already had some assembly "lessons"from the book "the art of exploitation"by Jon Erickson,but it was the minimum required to understand the book so I consider myself a beginner
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    `Programming from the ground up` : http://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/pgubook/

    Best Ebook i've yet found, tbh. Get the letter size PDF so it will print nicely should you want to print it.
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    Thanks again,I am going to check it out.Just another thing,does anybody bother to code directly in machine code?or maybe should I make up another post?
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    Devshed God 1st Plane (5500 - 5999 posts)

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    Hah, yeah, good one... Noone programs in machine code mate.
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    Originally Posted by LinuxPenguin
    Hah, yeah, good one... Noone programs in machine code mate.
    I don't think you can say that Penguin, I'm sure there are some who just want to go that step deeper .

    It's appealing and it would be very educational but for practical purposes no because it would take too long to do anything and the results would likely be unmaintainable. That said it would hurt your head in a good way and the depth of knowledge gained from doing something this if only for fun might help someone to write better Assembly?

    Not for the fain hearted but your welcome to try it ,

    Mark.
    programming language development: www.netytan.com Hula

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  21. fork while true;
    Devshed God 1st Plane (5500 - 5999 posts)

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    how so? End of the day, knowing a good detail in assembler is the most important things. The only step further you could usefully go is finding out about the structure of ELF headers etc.
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    Originally Posted by LinuxPenguin
    how so? End of the day, knowing a good detail in assembler is the most important things. The only step further you could usefully go is finding out about the structure of ELF headers etc.
    I would argue that anything that provides any extra insight into the architecture: its internals, design, personality etc. would help write better code.

    This is similar to how knowing a car inside and out makes for better drivers. Have you ever met a good mechanic who couldn't drive from the age of 3 .

    After writing in machine code for a while I would hypothesis that you'd understand more clearly how the instructions relate to each-other and to the whole, how they combine, there make-up and to some extent effect.

    This said I've never done it myself but maybe I will. It's about finding the mindset that works best no?

    Take care all ,

    Mark.
    programming language development: www.netytan.com Hula

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  25. fork while true;
    Devshed God 1st Plane (5500 - 5999 posts)

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    I disagree, since assembler just replaces numbers with mnemonics. The only difference is what i mentioned, structures of different executables
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    Originally Posted by LinuxPenguin
    I disagree, since assembler just replaces numbers with mnemonics. The only difference is what i mentioned, structures of different executables
    Who's to say that those bit patterns don't give some insight? Have you done machine level coding?

    I'll admit that I haven't looked at writing machine code but I'll keep an open mind about what can be gained from such an experience.

    There is more than replacing mnemonics with numbers, the bit patterns give you a glimpse of the underlying architecture if you've done or made anything with digital systems or logic gates in electronics such as half and full adders you should see this to be true, or I do.

    Just because from your perspective on the beach the water looks shallow doesn't mean that it is.

    While I was reading about ARM & MIPs assembly in particular I found that it's common to go into the bit patterns of most mnemonic and talk about it quite completely.

    From this level you can see relationships between mnemonics that aren't exactly obvious.

    In any case any learning is worth the undertaking; not to be snubbed off as pointless though misunderstanding .

    Take care,

    Mark.
    programming language development: www.netytan.com Hula

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  29. fork while true;
    Devshed God 1st Plane (5500 - 5999 posts)

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    Actually, it might surprise you to know i've done a fair bit with underlying machine code, not that that would be enough to quash your ego about such things.

    My assembler book seemed to think they needed to pad out the book so they could charge more, so there's a good section on how it translates into machine code.
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