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    Question AppWizard? (or Basic GUI Templates?)


    Hi,

    I haven't done any C coding in quite some time, and I feel pretty much like a newb again, I really only understand object oriented programming on a fundamental level. I am looking to start practicing with C++ and hopefully(eventually...) get accustomed to the current development atmostphere. While browsing these forums I came across people mentioning an "AppWizard," that can generate code for you to tweak as necessary. This sounds like the perfect thing for me to use to get used to coding again. But... I have no clue where to get it.

    I noticed that it seemed to be used in conjunction with Visual C++.. Is it a Microsoft product and would I have to buy it from them, or is it something I can download and use to generate code that might be compatable with other compilers?

    The first project I'll probably be working on will be a simple text parser.. Suggestions for that are welcome too, especially if you think I'm totally off the mark looking into this AppWizard thing.
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    Yes, the AppWizard is an integral part of the Development Studio (or whatever MS Marketing is calling it now) which is part-and-parcel of Microsoft Visual C++ (at least up to v6; I don't know what it's called in .NET).

    What is your compiler and development environment now? While you will progress up to GUI apps where VC++ would really help, you might be more inclined to be getting your feet wet first. I'm not sure what VC++6 is going for now, but I'm sure it's well over 100 USD.

    Free might be a more attractive option right now. I've had fairly good luck with Dev-C++ from bloodshed.net (as in "blood, sweat, and tears"). They offer a GUI IDE that will generate console or Windows apps (Win32), DLL's, and even GTK+ apps. I think that v5, which is in beta, does even more. I've mainly been using their MinGW port of gcc/g++ to compile networking console apps and have been successful.

    Don't get me wrong. I use VC++6 at work and am happy with it. But if your current goal is learning C++, this might be an easier and more affordable first step to take.
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    I'm not looking for someone to sell me on VC++, quite the opposite actually-- your post was very helpful. I'm downloading the Bloodshed development environment now and will test it out soon.

    The compiler I currently have is Metrowerks Codewarrior Profesional 3.2, which is about 5 years old I believe, they don't support any version older than 4 on their site. Worst comes to worst I can start tinkering with the example applications and see what I can come up with.

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