#1
  1. No Profile Picture
    Junior Member
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Alabama, USA
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0

    Lightbulb Get Visual C++? What book to buy?


    Hey Guys,
    I would like to know if it is worth buying Microsoft Visual C++.
    Right now I am using a free compiler called Dev-C++.

    Another thing that I would like to know is: do you guys are know of any good books on windows programming? I am trying to make a card game. I would like to learn how to use graphics and animation in windows.
    Or should I not get Visual C++ and just get a windows programming book.
    Or do you think I should get Visual C++ and get a book all about Visual C++.

    Thank you very much for your time!

    I would really appreciate any help from you,
    Elijah Lofgren
  2. #2
  3. No Profile Picture
    Contributing User
    Devshed Beginner (1000 - 1499 posts)

    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    1,481
    Rep Power
    15
    "No Jesus No Peace. Know Jesus Know Peace."

    Why don't you ask Him what to do?
  4. #3
  5. Contributing User
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    7,169
    Rep Power
    2222
    Whether you get Visual C++ or stick with Dev-C++ depends on what you are going to do. If it's just to learn C++ and/or Windows programming (depending on what kind), then Dev-C++ would be a more cost-effective way to go. But if you need to support MFC, COM, and whatever other acronyms Microsoft offers, then you would need to go with Visual C++.

    MFC is a different style of Windows programming, because the message-processing mechanics that you need to code in SDK (Software Development Kit, AKA "the Windows API") programming has been encapsulated in a framework of classes, the Microsoft Foundation Classes. You can put an application together faster, but then you also need to learn the behavior of the classes you are working with and, in some cases, how to work around the classes to get your program to do what you want it to do. At least you can still use the Windows API for such cases. But with MFC, you pretty much commit yourself to Visual C++ from that point on.

    If you want to go with Windows API programming, Dev-C++ supports that. Charles Petzold's "Programming Windows __" books are the standard; I'm not sure what his latest one is. The latest I have is "Programming Windows 95", which is the earliest one that you should consider.

    For MFC, I'm not current; I learned years ago, so I'm not up on the latest books:
    Ivor Horton's "Beginning Visual C++" from Wrox was good and I've seen it recommended here a number of times. First it covers C++, then MFC programming in a rather tutorial fashion. I found it useful for getting started and for some of its example code.

    Kruglinski's "Inside Visual C++" was also good, but assumes you already know C++, so it's devoted completely to MFC. As such, it can cover a wider range of topics than Horton can. However, it covers them in a less tutorial fashion.

    There are probably other very good and possibly better books out there, but others will have to tell you about them.
    Last edited by dwise1_aol; May 5th, 2003 at 10:15 AM.
  6. #4
  7. No Profile Picture
    Junior Member
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Alabama, USA
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0

    Thank you dwise1_aol


    Thank you very much for the great information.
    I guess I'll just keep using Dev-C++.
    Thanks again!

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo