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    Question good visual c++ book?


    are there any really good begining to end visual c++ books?
    i've got ivor horton's Beginning Visual C++ 6 book, its ok but i hate the way he teaches. i can't find any O'Reilly books about it.
    any suggestions?
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    "...but i hate the way he teaches."

    What do you think are the weaknesses of the book? Any strengths?
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    Well, for one thing he goes way to fast. And he makes refrences to things in the begining chapters that are way to advanced to even be mentioned yet, and then instead of teaching you about them, he just drops and gives the chapter that we'll learn about that in. Another thing is that he will teach you about a couple things, and then have an example that has nothing to do with what was just taught. I could probably learn Visual C++ from this book alone, but i'd like to have another to read also. The O'Reilly Learning Perl book was the most straight forward book i've ever read. It started with the very basics and slowly graduated to more complex things.
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    Arrow


    Try Jesse Liberty's Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days from SAMS Publishing. Really good book!
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    I read the TEACH YOURSELF VISUAL C++ IN 21 DAYS, by SAMS, and i found it terrible. It doesn't teach you anything. If you need something exaclty the way is in book, then fine. But if you want to change it a little....
    Try USING VISUAL C++ by KATE GREGORY. It is not very wasy, but if you spent some time, you will learn.
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    Visual C++ and C++ are really two different things. It sounds like you want to learn C++. I think Ivor Horton's Beginning C++ is a great book. It looks to me like the first part of Beginning Visual C++ is a condensed version of Beginning C++, and therefore it doesn't cover things as well.

    I refer back to Ivor Horton's Beginning C++ all the time, and the more I use it as a reference the more I realize that it covers all the important stuff.
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    I found that Ivor Horton teaches very well. He does not go too fast - you just have to go over the examples until you understand them before you move on. If you move on, then you are missing foundations that are required for later chapters. The things that he mentions will be taught later are taught later and are not needed at the time... so this is not a problem. I find that it is better to mentions stuff like this, then to not mention it at all.

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